Dan Gould

Overlooked Saxophonists

154 posts in this topic

Yeah, saw Liebman in Charlie Evans' group not too long ago - intense music, far less than twenty people in attendance. 

Edited by clifford_thornton

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Not to belabor the obvious, but the term "overlooked" could be applied to nearly every jazz saxophone players these days. 

A few months ago, I saw David Liebman in NYC and there were maybe 20 people in the audience.  And Liebman is an NEA Jazz Master! 

Liebman is doing badly! About 50 turned out to see him in Manchester in May. It goes without saying that the music was superb.

Disgraceful - the guy is a master musician and a very eloquent speaker about jazz. If it had been nearer, I would have been up there like a shot to see that one..

Edited by sidewinder

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Not to belabor the obvious, but the term "overlooked" could be applied to nearly every jazz saxophone players these days. 

A few months ago, I saw David Liebman in NYC and there were maybe 20 people in the audience.  And Liebman is an NEA Jazz Master! 

Liebman is doing badly! About 50 turned out to see him in Manchester in May. It goes without saying that the music was superb.

Disgraceful - the guy is a master musician and a very eloquent speaker about jazz. If it had been nearer, I would have been up there like a shot to see that one..

I think part of the problem was the lack of publicity. I only got to hear of the gig two days in advance, at which stage I'd had a ticket for two months for the Christian McBride Trio who appeared the following week at the same venue with an audience of 200.

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What about J.R. Monterose? He recorded a very good album on Blue Note, but actually recorded very little as leader or sideman over the course of his life.

 

Ferdinand Povel and Jerry Weldon are some others.

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What about J.R. Monterose? He recorded a very good album on Blue Note, ...

Oh yes, his debut album:

22723751cl.jpg

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What about J.R. Monterose? He recorded a very good album on Blue Note, ...

Oh yes, his debut album:

22723751cl.jpg

The Uptown Live In Albany is very good.

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And that Jaro album of his is a stone classic.

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...and the duets with Tommy Flanagan are nice.

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Even the one with Joe Abodeely is good.

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I count eight Monterose sessions as a leader or co-leader in my LP shelves. Missing the Cadence date with Hugh Brodie.

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As his name poppped up in the overlooked pianists thread: Pony Poindexter

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Sonny Criss - not totally overlooked, but not fully appreciated either, IMHO.

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Has Charles Tyler been mentioned? I especially dug Eastern Man Alone (with Dave Baker on cello, and two bassists). Made me laugh.

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Australian jazz musicians tend to get overlooked as a whole...I only came to notice them because of Kenny Weir's advocacy some years back (where did he go?).

Three who immediately spring to mind:

  • Bernie McGann - some excellent live recording out there of this veteran who recently passed away.
  • Jamie Oehlers - wide ranging modernist who moves between a range of contemporary styles right out to the free.
  • Sandy Evans - plays both straight contemporary jazz but also a great deal in world music styles. Saw her over here last weak with the wonderful Australian Balkan band Mara!

Where they fit in the great 'who's best?' hierarchy I haven't a clue but they've given me much pleasure. 

Edited by A Lark Ascending

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has Bobby Jones alredy been mentioned?

Edited by uli

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Australian jazz musicians tend to get overlooked as a whole...I only came to notice them because of Kenny Weir's advocacy some years back (where did he go?).

Three who immediately spring to mind:

  • Bernie McGann - some excellent live recording out there of this veteran who recently passed away.
  • Jamie Oehlers - wide ranging modernist who moves between a range of contemporary styles right out to the free.
  • Sandy Evans - plays both straight contemporary jazz but also a great deal in world music styles. Saw her over here last weak with the wonderful Australian Balkan band Mara!

Where they fit in the great 'who's best?' hierarchy I haven't a clue but they've given me much pleasure. 

Yes to both Evans, who is highly active and versatile, and McGann. http://www.goodbaitbooks.com/newsletter.htm is my essay about McGann's CDs, which are strong latebop music. [Haven't heard Oehlers.]

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Mel Martin, another SF area musician who would be much better known if he lived/worked in NYC.  I just recently listened to his most recent CD, Where The Warm Winds Blow, and it demonstrates he has quite a fluent and creative voice on a number of reed instruments.  He has recorded a few CDs with his idol/mentor Benny Carter and some CDs with his group Bebop & Beyond.  His work is definitely worth checking out if you are unfamiliar with him.

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Australian jazz musicians tend to get overlooked as a whole...I only came to notice them because of Kenny Weir's advocacy some years back (where did he go?).

Three who immediately spring to mind:

  • Bernie McGann - some excellent live recording out there of this veteran who recently passed away.
  • Jamie Oehlers - wide ranging modernist who moves between a range of contemporary styles right out to the free.
  • Sandy Evans - plays both straight contemporary jazz but also a great deal in world music styles. Saw her over here last weak with the wonderful Australian Balkan band Mara!

Where they fit in the great 'who's best?' hierarchy I haven't a clue but they've given me much pleasure. 

Yes to both Evans, who is highly active and versatile, and McGann. http://www.goodbaitbooks.com/newsletter.htm is my essay about McGann's CDs, which are strong latebop music. [Haven't heard Oehlers.]

Thanks for the link. Had a glance at the article and it seems just what I need to navigate his catalogue beyond the little I have. Bit busy at present but will follow it up in the next week. 

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Excellent article; I have the recent archival LP, which is awesome, and the two Emanem LPs (really good too).

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Mel Martin, another SF area musician who would be much better known if he lived/worked in NYC.  I just recently listened to his most recent CD, Where The Warm Winds Blow, and it demonstrates he has quite a fluent and creative voice on a number of reed instruments.  He has recorded a few CDs with his idol/mentor Benny Carter and some CDs with his group Bebop & Beyond.  His work is definitely worth checking out if you are unfamiliar with him.

He also has (had?) a website that has (had?) a section of interviews he conducted with many, many, great saxophonists, in which they talked shop and life-as-a-player type things...pretty rare stuff, like to hear Wayne Shorter get into a discussion about the specifics of different mouthpieces, hey, you hear Wayne get all cosmic and shit, well, yeah, there's that, but behind that is this, dig? Johnny Griffin talking about how Lockjaw worked his horn, that type thing.

Funny (for me) thing about Mel Martin, though. I had a college buddy from the Bay Area who hated the guy because apparently back in his days with Cold Blood, Mel Martin was one of those guys who would show up on everybody's gig to sit in. Everywhere all the time. I asked my buddy if he sucked or anything, was that why he always said the words "Mel Martin" with such disdain, and his answer still makes me laugh - "no, he plays well enough...it's just that....he's always there....you turn around to order a drink, look back up, and....there's Mel Martin up on the stand...HE NEVER GOES AWAY...YOU CAN'T MAKE HIM STOP!!!!".

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Mel Martin, another SF area musician who would be much better known if he lived/worked in NYC.  I just recently listened to his most recent CD, Where The Warm Winds Blow, and it demonstrates he has quite a fluent and creative voice on a number of reed instruments.  He has recorded a few CDs with his idol/mentor Benny Carter and some CDs with his group Bebop & Beyond.  His work is definitely worth checking out if you are unfamiliar with him.

 

Funny (for me) thing about Mel Martin, though. I had a college buddy from the Bay Area who hated the guy because apparently back in his days with Cold Blood, Mel Martin was one of those guys who would show up on everybody's gig to sit in. Everywhere all the time. I asked my buddy if he sucked or anything, was that why he always said the words "Mel Martin" with such disdain, and his answer still makes me laugh - "no, he plays well enough...it's just that....he's always there....you turn around to order a drink, look back up, and....there's Mel Martin up on the stand...HE NEVER GOES AWAY...YOU CAN'T MAKE HIM STOP!!!!".

:excited:  That's funny!

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