mjzee

BFT 211 is up and running!

52 posts in this topic

19 minutes ago, randyhersom said:

... I do like guitarists that bring a rock edge to a jazz session.

Opinions may vary ...

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Audra McDonald

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Posted (edited)

Don't have time to go through all of these at the moment, but quickly :

 

1) That's got to be early Jug, and with the boogie piano, I suspect this is father and son, Albert and Gene, on St. Louis Blues, c. late '40s

2) Not sure. Need more time.

3) Sounds like early Phil Woods on alto, but the tenor player is confusing me. Could be Al or Zoot but something tells me it isn't. Pres-influenced but not always supple -- some spots where his fingers and articulation aren't in sync. Maybe he was having an off day? Hungover? Might be one of those Manny Album productions as composer/arranger. Deductive reasoning suggests Eddie Costa is the vibes player. No idea who that is on guitar.

4) Hmm. First thing is I don't like it. Got a smooth '70s Latinish/fusionish vibe with the percussion and all. Was this recorded on the West Coast? Was going to guess Chuck Mangione for a minute, but then the flugelhorn played some high shit that doesn't sound like Chuck. These are jazz players -- the pianist after the 2 min mark plays some McCoyish tremolos and there's some intentional dissonance in the soprano solo. Stumped.

5) That's Airto's CTI record "Free" and Keith Jarrett's bossa "Lucky Southern." Always interesting to hear Keith as a sideman. I wish he had kept doing other folks' record dates. Ron Carter on bass -- only a few records with Jarrett and Carter together. I like the tune. Blissful D major -- but with some some harmonic bite snuck in there and enough movement  to add meat to the bone. Also like the fact the performance is short, which helps keep the melody in the forefront. Did Keith ever play this with the Standards Trio? Would've made a nice encore piece in a similarly brief version. 

Edited by Mark Stryker

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28 minutes ago, Mark Stryker said:

1) That's got to be early Jug, and with the boogie piano, I suspect this is father and son, Albert and Gene, on St. Louis Blues, c. late '40s

Correct!  I loved the father and son aspect, and I don't know if it's Gene's doing, but Albert especially plays his ass off.

29 minutes ago, Mark Stryker said:

3) Sounds like early Phil Woods on alto, but the tenor player is confusing me. Could be Al or Zoot but something tells me it isn't. Pres-influenced but not always supple -- some spots where his fingers and articulation aren't in sync. Maybe he was having an off day? Hungover? Might be one of those Manny Album productions as composer/arranger. Deductive reasoning suggests Eddie Costa is the vibes player. No idea who that is on guitar.

You got it mostly right.  The identity of the tenor will surprise you.

32 minutes ago, Mark Stryker said:

5) That's Airto's CTI record "Free" and Keith Jarrett's bossa "Lucky Southern." Always interesting to hear Keith as a sideman. I wish he had kept doing other folks' record dates. Ron Carter on bass -- only a few records with Jarrett and Carter together. I like the tune. Blissful D major -- but with some some harmonic bite snuck in there and enough movement  to add meat to the bone. Also like the fact the performance is short, which helps keep the melody in the forefront. Did Keith ever play this with the Standards Trio? Would've made a nice encore piece in a similarly brief version. 

Correct.  There's a nice vibe to this album owing to the varied group of musicians - superstars before the star-maker machinery kicked in.  And I liked that it was short - especially on a BFT, I don't like taking up too much of the listener's time.  State your piece and get out.

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14 hours ago, randyhersom said:

David Torn, Marc Ribot and Mary Halvorson could be guesses for 15.  I do like guitarists that bring a rock edge to a jazz session.

None of them, sorry.

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Coming a little late on this one. Thanks for the space on the link - got to avoid the earlier comments...Great selection on these tracks. Lots of good melodies. Definitely enjoyed the listen. 

1- Big rhythm on this one. Love the switch when the horns come in. Awesome sax solo. Is this from the 40s?

2- Great funky blues. This smokes. Is it live? there's some banter in places Fantastic bass solo too. 

3- Holy sax player. Did he quote Woody Woodpecker there at the end? Great tune.

4 -  Elevated mood on this one. Sounds like a proto-contemporary revival kind of song.

5 -  Sounds related to #4 a bit, at least in terms of mood. Flirts with muzak-esque territory a little bit. 

6 - Is this an 80s recording? Great funk for that decade if so. Love the comment at the end lol. Overall sound is like something from Herbie Hancock. 

7 - The speed reminds me of Pat Martino or Joe Pass but not sure if it's their sound.  

8 - Sweet guitar playing here. Song is familiar but I can't name it. 

9 - Not for me

10 - Someone can play a guitar very well. The percussion works too. 

11 - Is that Coryell on guitar? Maybe Corea on keys? Fast stuff. 

12 - Woody Herman? 

13 - Dramatic arrangement. 

14 - Love the tempo of this track. Very laid back but still super funky. 

15 - Wild shredding from the guitarist. 

16 - Sounds a bit like Rypdal on guitar. Really interesting track. On a hunch I searched discogs for Rypdal/Darling and found this one. Fifth song from here. Probably named elsewhere in the thread by now. I've never listened to this album but now I have to hear it. 

17 - Wish I liked this, but can't. Unique for sure. 

18 - Dug the sax solo. 

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35 minutes ago, Dub Modal said:

Coming a little late on this one. Thanks for the space on the link - got to avoid the earlier comments...Great selection on these tracks. Lots of good melodies. Definitely enjoyed the listen. 

1- Big rhythm on this one. Love the switch when the horns come in. Awesome sax solo. Is this from the 40s?

2- Great funky blues. This smokes. Is it live? there's some banter in places Fantastic bass solo too. 

3- Holy sax player. Did he quote Woody Woodpecker there at the end? Great tune.

4 -  Elevated mood on this one. Sounds like a proto-contemporary revival kind of song.

5 -  Sounds related to #4 a bit, at least in terms of mood. Flirts with muzak-esque territory a little bit. 

6 - Is this an 80s recording? Great funk for that decade if so. Love the comment at the end lol. Overall sound is like something from Herbie Hancock. 

7 - The speed reminds me of Pat Martino or Joe Pass but not sure if it's their sound.  

8 - Sweet guitar playing here. Song is familiar but I can't name it. 

9 - Not for me

10 - Someone can play a guitar very well. The percussion works too. 

11 - Is that Coryell on guitar? Maybe Corea on keys? Fast stuff. 

12 - Woody Herman? 

13 - Dramatic arrangement. 

14 - Love the tempo of this track. Very laid back but still super funky. 

15 - Wild shredding from the guitarist. 

16 - Sounds a bit like Rypdal on guitar. Really interesting track. On a hunch I searched discogs for Rypdal/Darling and found this one. Fifth song from here. Probably named elsewhere in the thread by now. I've never listened to this album but now I have to hear it. 

17 - Wish I liked this, but can't. Unique for sure. 

18 - Dug the sax solo. 

Thanks for the kind words.  I'm glad you liked it...well, mostly liked it (#17 seems to be generally striking out, which is interesting).  You nailed #16, which a lot of people seem to like (also interesting).  I think #16 works because it's short, and plucked from 40 minutes of similar stuff - we're able to focus on it like a jewel.  Sorry you'll have to wait until the end of the month for the identity of the other tracks, but a look back will identify some.

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Listening again. The drummer's shuffle style on #6 really makes that track work for me. When they break down with the bass and guitar it's a nice little jam. Others are put off by the snyth piano and yeah, it's the worst part of this song. @Milestones ID'd this one already but outside of the synths I think it's a good track. That drummer would be Kenwood Dennard who is a totally new name for me. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Dub Modal said:

Listening again. The drummer's shuffle style on #6 really makes that track work for me. When they break down with the bass and guitar it's a nice little jam. Others are put off by the snyth piano and yeah, it's the worst part of this song. @Milestones ID'd this one already but outside of the synths I think it's a good track. That drummer would be Kenwood Dennard who is a totally new name for me. 

 

 

I agree re Dennard.  He and Delmar Brown (keyboards) were on Pat's album Joyous Lake.  This album "Stone Blue" was meant to be a reunion of the band that did Joyous Lake (this album is actually billed as Pat Martino & Joyous Lake).  I was fortunate enough to see this band do a support gig for this album at Columbia University.  It was a very intense (and loud) concert.

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This one had a divisive feel for me.  Some of it I really liked, some of it I really didn't.  Still good exercise on the ears, though!

Track 01 -- Seems like a good opening theme for a radio show.  St. Louis Blues, obviously.  My obvious guesses would be Fatha Hines, but is isn't.  Maybe Meade Lux Lewis?  Third listen. That tenor, it's bugging me.  That's a young Jug, isn't it.  I'm going to switch gears and say it's Albert.

Track 02 -- Obviously a live date.  It's simple but honest.  I don't think I know the tenor.  There are moments where I feel like it's maybe Chico, but it's not.  Maybe an early Joe McPhee?  

Track 03 -- Well, that's Phil Woods before he bought into being Phil Woods (really feel his stuff after 1968 is lacking, but that's just me).  Don't know the vibist.  I like the tenor, but there's something very sloppy about his articulation.  I'm guessing he's a doubler, though I can't say what the main axe is, only that it's not tenor.  The whole feel here is that it wants to swing, but it really doesn't.  Tempo is rushing badly in the guitar solo, but it's not Art Taylor.  

Track 04 -- This is quite a switch.  Has that Ibrahim feel off the bat.  Not him.  Not sold on that melody.  Almost sounds like a Chuck Mangione thing, but I prefer Chuck's writing.  Piano has a nice feel to it (really embracing the Ibrahim feel, but not him).  Improv of the trumpet is much more to my liking.  Maybe John McNeil?  Not in love with the unemployment stick.  A decidedly Hebraic approach.  Don't think I know this player.  Has that feel of 80s Jazz, which explains my aversion to this melody.

Track 05 -- Tune is Lucky Southern, but it's not Keith's version.  I did a session with some alums of a music program in western NH a few years back.  They all knew this song (I did not, at the time), but didn't know Walkin', Firm Roots, or several other songs that, to my ear, are far more worthy.

Track 06 -- Oh.  This just took a turn.  Sorry man, but there's too much here that I dislike on this cut.  Electric bass, compressed drums, and that horrific 80s keyboard.  Not to mention, the song is... well, lame.  I'm trying.  That's Pat Martino, but not his output that I care for.  Don't know the tenor.  Somebody from the conservatory set.  Not Branford or Joshua, but someone from the same era.  And now we're at the keyboard solo.  Hard pass -- I'm out.

Track 07 -- I like the bass line.  Okay, didn't see it becoming this.  Bohemia After Dark, but I'm not the least bit familiar with the guitarist.  It's not Pat, but he owes Pat lunch (or she).  Man, what happened to music in the 80s.  It's not that there's anything "wrong" with it, there's just no soul to it.  And more compressed drums.  I'm out after two minutes.

Track 08 -- Well, this is going to be Stolen Moments.  Needle drop... that's promising.  Guitarist is in love with reharmonizing the melody, which is completely unnecessary.  Maybe Dave Stryker?  I like the bass, a lot.  In fact, both the drums and bass are very supportive.  The solo is nice, I just don't care for the way he's butchering that melody.  We get it, you can play extensions.  In spite of what was done to the melody, overall, I like the cut.

Track 09 --  i know who, but not what.  A friend once described the female vocalist as, "sort of comforting, like if my mother had been a Jazz singer."  I never really warmed up to her, but she can sing, no doubt about it.  This feels a lot like a children's song, which is fine, but I'm not sure I'd go back to it.  So, I'm not familiar enough with her work to tell you what the tune or album is, but it's clearly Sheila Jordan.  I don't know the other voice.  

Track 10 -- Another needle drop and more guitar.  I don't know this music.  It's there, but doesn't really make an impression.

Track 11 -- Is this an actual bop tune?  Seems more like it's written in that style, but I can never get the titles of those tunes straight, anyway.  This wouldn't be my first choice of instrumentation, but all are terrific players.  Don't know who it is.  I like it fine, but not sure I would pick it from the stacks.  Not in love with the drum solo.  Maybe Alan Dawson?

Track 12 -- Cherokee fools no one.  Not a band I know well.  Has a bit of the feel of Maynard's early 60s band, but not as in your face.  Don't recognize the soloists.  If this was on at someone's house when I walked in, I'd love it.  This is a good cut.

Track 13 -- Like that bari (and another needle drop).  Okay, tearful willow it is.  Man, that baritone is beastly!  Dense band.  The alto is not who I want it to be (Sonny Criss).  It takes a turn there, but I like it.  Same idea as the previous cut.  I don't think I'd necessarily reach for it in the stacks, but if I walked into someone's house and it was playing, I'd be pretty excited.  

Track 14 -- Too much head.  Like someone spent a month listening to Tristano and Dave Holland, then wrote this.  It's too programmed.  Interesting that the head goes through so much effort to be in broken time, but when the solos start they go to straight ahead 4/4.  Not feeling this one. Don't know the flute.  It's newer guys.  I don't know who they are.  Tenor reminds me of Ralph Bowen, but less of a story.  Alto could be somebody like Steve Wilson or Mike DiRubbio.  Is that a bass clari?  Man, I heard a dude in Montreal about a decade ago that all but ruined that instrument for me.  Imagine Joe Henderson playing bass clarinet.  This dude was a BAD MF!  Name was Mathieu Belanger.  This is not him.  I know that Barney McAll writes a lot of angular stuff like this, but for me, this just missed.

Track 15 -- Drums push kind of like Han Bennink, but this sounds newer.  Not sure I love the guitar, but he's original... touch of Sonny Sharrock, but just a touch.  Really like the overall feel of this.  After the two minute mark, it's going a little Bitches Brew.  Not in a bad way, but maybe extending a bit long.  I like the feel more than I like the solos.  Feels like guys "playing out" as opposed to out players.  Yeah, the alto misses for me.  Too bad, because the rhythm section is giving him plenty to work with.  I like the trumpet, but again, seems more like a guy "playing out" as opposed to being an out player.  The trumpet solo works, though.  Overall the track works, but for the alto solo.  Interested in what this is.

Track 16 -- Feels like a soundtrack.  I don't really get it.

Track 17 -- What!?  No idea.

Track 18 -- Getting to Know Wayne.  Wayne fools no one.  Clearly Cedar Walton.  I've got it on the Vee Jay box set.  No idea what it was originally released on.  Yeah, that's Blakey, so this was likely from when he was a Messenger, but not a messenger date.

Feel like I need to qualify the statements -- I always just do a stream of conscience when I take the BFT.  Reading it over, seems like I hated it.  I did not, though there were several misses.  Love the Shorter tune for the closer.

 

 

 

 

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One reason I like doing BFTs is it enables me to hear music I know through someone else's ears.

2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 01 -- Seems like a good opening theme for a radio show.  St. Louis Blues, obviously.  My obvious guesses would be Fatha Hines, but is isn't.  Maybe Meade Lux Lewis?  Third listen. That tenor, it's bugging me.  That's a young Jug, isn't it.  I'm going to switch gears and say it's Albert.

Correct 2x!

2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 03 -- Well, that's Phil Woods before he bought into being Phil Woods (really feel his stuff after 1968 is lacking, but that's just me).  Don't know the vibist.  I like the tenor, but there's something very sloppy about his articulation.  I'm guessing he's a doubler, though I can't say what the main axe is, only that it's not tenor.  The whole feel here is that it wants to swing, but it really doesn't.  Tempo is rushing badly in the guitar solo, but it's not Art Taylor.  

Fascinating.  You are correct that the tenor isn't playing his main instrument.

2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 04 -- This is quite a switch.  Has that Ibrahim feel off the bat.  Not him.  Not sold on that melody.  Almost sounds like a Chuck Mangione thing, but I prefer Chuck's writing.  Piano has a nice feel to it (really embracing the Ibrahim feel, but not him).  Improv of the trumpet is much more to my liking.  Maybe John McNeil?  Not in love with the unemployment stick.  A decidedly Hebraic approach.  Don't think I know this player.  Has that feel of 80s Jazz, which explains my aversion to this melody.

It was recorded in 1981.

2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 09 --  i know who, but not what.  A friend once described the female vocalist as, "sort of comforting, like if my mother had been a Jazz singer."  I never really warmed up to her, but she can sing, no doubt about it.  This feels a lot like a children's song, which is fine, but I'm not sure I'd go back to it.  So, I'm not familiar enough with her work to tell you what the tune or album is, but it's clearly Sheila Jordan.  I don't know the other voice.

It is Sheila.  It's a little like a lullaby, but has a harmonic richness I like.  I find the piano affecting, too.

 

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I think It's time we found out which tracks JSngry nailed so we know what tracks are unidentified.

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1 hour ago, randyhersom said:

I think It's time we found out which tracks JSngry nailed so we know what tracks are unidentified.

I know I have am correct on these players:

# 1 - Albert & Gene Ammons...from the Mercury set

#3 - Phil Woods, Herbie Mann, Eddie Cost, & Joe Puma...it's a Savoy record

#5 - "Lucky Southern, from Airtos's Free (CTI)

#10 - George Van Epps...forget the name of the song but it's on some unlikely looking Columbia record.

!18 - Wayne - Getting to Know You from Second Genesis(Vee-Jay)

And I think I've gotten #17 as Audra McDonald singing "My Man's Gone" probably with the Houston Symphony...it sounds like a 78 on my phone!

I'm wondering about how Dub Modal (on #11) and I (on #15) both called Larry Coryell, but on two different tracks...is one of us right or are we both wrong?

And the big band on #13....that one's got me intrigued. I could almost say Kashmere, but I don't know if they ever recorded this one ...

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

#10 - George Van Epps...forget the name of the song but it's on some unlikely looking Columbia record.

Van Eps is a new artist for me. Searching around his discography and I can't find this track but am blown away by looking him up on YT. Finger picking a 7 string acoustic huh? 

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Track #10 is indeed George Van Eps, doing "Tango El Bongo" from his album Mellow Guitar.

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Time for some hints:

#2: The saxist is not the leader.

#4: Chuck might know this one.

#7 & #8: Both releases are on Pablo.

#11: Wilbur Little on bass.

#12: It's tough to be the boss.

#13: The bari is not the leader.

#14: The breakout star (at least for me) from my BFT last year.

#15: The guitarist is not the leader.

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19 hours ago, mjzee said:

#7 & #8: Both releases are on Pablo.

#11: Wilbur Little on bass.

 

That makes #7 Ron Affif, #8 Lorne Lofsky, & #11 the Al Haig/Jimmy Rainey quartet (on Spotlite).

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Would 12 be Dave Tough?

on #4 Did you slip some Roscoe by us?

 

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4 hours ago, randyhersom said:

Would 12 be Dave Tough?

on #4 Did you slip some Roscoe by us?

 

Sorry, but no to both.  Zut alors!

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20 hours ago, JSngry said:

That makes #7 Ron Affif, #8 Lorne Lofsky, & #11 the Al Haig/Jimmy Rainey quartet (on Spotlite).

More specifically then, #7 is the opening cut from this .

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1 hour ago, felser said:

More specifically then, #7 is the opening cut from this .

Correct!

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17 Before the singing I tought Film Noir music then it became Richard Wagner's take on spirituals and the blues.

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44 minutes ago, miles65 said:

17 Before the singing I tought Film Noir music then it became Richard Wagner's take on spirituals and the blues.

It is stormy, isn't it?  I was fortunate to see the performance live, and it was stunning.

To all: There's still time to record your impressions of this BFT here!  Everyone can have opinions, and for the more objectively-minded, a few tracks have not yet been identified.

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