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Guy Berger

Jack DeJohnette, Made in Chicago (ECM)

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I believe Jack is in search of funding to take this band on the road.

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I believe Jack is in search of funding to take this band on the road.

A tour would be incredible. Out of that entire group, I've only seen DeJohnette live, so to see them all on one stage would be special.

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The pre-order price at Amazon seems high.

Hope it comes down!

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I believe Jack is in search of funding to take this band on the road.

A tour would be incredible. Out of that entire group, I've only seen DeJohnette live, so to see them all on one stage would be special.

I have only seen/heard Jack a few times live but the others are in the dozens and beyond.

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The pre-order price at Amazon seems high.

Hope it comes down!

It's listed as an import, but I'm guessing the status will change when it comes out.

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The pre-order price at Amazon seems high.

Hope it comes down!

Is it a 2 disc set?

Also, oddly, I'm seeing conflicting release dates - Amazon says January 27th, but the ECM press release posted elsewhere on Org says March.

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It was very fine as a performance - what I would expect from those folks. I am just curious about the way it will be programmed.

Ah! Makes sense.

Apparently some of the performances from the concert are online here.

Sounds very good! I'll be picking up the CD.

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Still says $37.95 at Amazon US!

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There are other vendors.[/quote

Prices???

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There are other vendors.[/quote

Prices???

$15 preorder at Dejohnette's website.

Says shipping early March.

Edited by jlhoots

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Bought my ticket to this show earlier in the week. :tup

Also took a moment to buy a ticket to the Campbell Brothers' sacred steel guitar interpretation of Coltrane's "A Love Supreme" at the same venue, which I am also excited about

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Nice review of "Made In Chicago" in WSJ.

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An article in last Sunday's NYTimes about the AACM and this band/album.

50 Years On

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If he manages to get that band to perform over here, I will go see it. Unless it is several hundred miles from here.

Til then, can someone who has listened to the CD report how it sounds?

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To my ears, it sounds pretty good - and the music itself is darn fine, too!

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Long story, but would up with two copies. I will sell the extra copy for $10 anywhere in the US postage paid. PM if interested.

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it is gone, thanks to those who responded

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I've been listening to this one nonstop since Wednesday. It's interesting to me that Uppercase historical legacy of the AACM will have much to do with the braided legacies of innovation and civil rights in jazz, because this sort of belies the fact that a lot of their operative contribution to the modern musical landscape has been multidirectional rather than strictly progressive.

To put it another way, unlike, say, the music of Mingus, which was deeply social conscious but firmly embedded in the sonic iconology of its idiom--or, for that matter, the music of Albert Ayler, which takes the music to its formal breaking point even as it's intended to be socially visionary--I've understood the AACM's uniquest gift to be the way in which it expanded the possibilities of what can be done, where, and with whom.

When I listen to Roscoe, Muhal, Threadgill, etc., I don't hear either terminal points or new beginnings--I see a lateral redefinition of what things are at a given point in time. You cannot understate the social value of this. Guys like Braxton and Roscoe have reconfigured what it means to be a Black American Musician--and, in turn, they have blown the doors completely away for many in subsequent generations. When I first "got" to the Art Ensemble, and when I began interacting with musicians who had come of age in the post-AACM climate of jazz, it actually kind of gave me (as a Filipino-American preoccupied with abstract improvisation) back to myself, whole. I imagine that my experience is not necessarily rare.

I've listened to Made in Chicago a number of times in the past couple of days, and what sticks out to me the most is that this--in the broad strokes, at least--is what we need more of. Not necessarily by and from these musicians, who have given so much and will hopefully continue to do so, but by musicians and artists in a general sense. If the AACM is like NASA, we need more space explorers.

None of this is to say that this is the greatest album of the year, month, or day--it's in fact alternately breathtaking and weirdly halting (the WSJ article is pretty close to my initial impressions). What really got to me, though, is just how deeply individualistic all of the voices on this record are. It is a real live document. Although many of the ensemble passages are ragged, you actually get to hear these august explorers negotiate their musical relationships in real time, and it's an essay in both musical risk taking and the boldness of exploded expectations.

The closest comparison I can think of is Braxton's Ensemble (Victoriaville) 1998--similarly all-star, but also kind of unpolished and discursive--but this one is on another level. I'd love for someone to tell me about a recent album by a vetted and/or relatively mainstream musician (jazz or otherwise) that is so demonstratively searching. And then I'd love for someone to tell me why there aren't more examples.

One illustrative moment really springs to mind, and that's right in the middle of the opening track ("Chant")--Roscoe is in the midst of this phenomenal circular breathing enterprise, with Muhal, Gray, and DeJohnette playing very coloristically behind (it's reminiscent, in the inverted rhythmic momentum of powerhouse saxophone + more textural rhythm section, of The Flow of Things), and then Threadgill jumps in for a sort-of solo. What do you do on top of this? And then Threadgill plays this deeply funky, Robert McCollough-cum-Albert Ayler shit (similar to his playing with Zooid), and it, again, recontextualizes the whole thing. Now it's not strictly what you expected--it's both a clashing and melding of identities, Roscoe +/vs Threadgill. That's a real collaboration, a real band hit.

These guys, I hope they're here forever--if not here physically, then definitely here spiritually. I hope that Roscoe knows what he's done for me on a really high musical and personal level, though our personal conversations have always been either deeply casual or just nuts-and-bolts mechanical. This band DeJohnette put together--in the best possible way, it reminds me of both why I can and that I should create, and that's not a small thing.

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