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king ubu

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Posts posted by king ubu

  1. Thanks, Mike. I will look for that. Re: Classics, I'm a little bit afraid to start with getting them - because once I have two or three, I want to have all of them...

    ubu

  2. Yes, I have the two boxes (solo & group) - in their german (ZYX) incarnations but the usual old Fantasy remastering (which sounds fine to me).

    I though about recordings from the thirties/forties.

    ubu

  3. I'm starting to get into Tatum. I picked up the two masterpiieces box-sets from the recent zweitauseneins sale. Then I have the Complete Capitol and the 20th Century Piano Genius 2CDs.

    What about some earlier recordings? Where could I start with Tatum? I am somehow reluctant to start with his later/latest music, so would be glad about some recommendations on earlier Tatum recordings.

    ubu

  4. I listened to all the studio sessions over the weekend. Great music. And somehow, sameness doesn't matter, Wilson being such a master and the changing rhythm sections really bringing a dirfferent feel to every session. Thumbs up also for Jo Jones!

    By the way: (becasue of the title of the set): what else (in non-trio line-ups, obviously) did Wilson record for Verve? I have the Jazz Giants and Prez & Teddy sessions. Is there something else?

    ubu

  5. Love Nat!

    Check out the recordings he made with J.J. Johnson (included in the JJ Columbia mosaic). Those with cornet/trombone only frontline are my favorites among them.

    Then yes, "Work Song"! A gem. With the different line ups things get very interesting. Good solos from everybody, too.

    The VME of Nat's (can't remember the title - it has Cannon, Silver, Chambers and Roy Haynes) is great, too.

    Anyone in for recommendations of leader dates Nat made? I know much of the stuff he made with Cannonball, and I'd like to have some more of Nat (without Cannon), too.

    Good thread!

    ubu

  6. Yeah, Woddy! He deserves having his own thread!

    I grabbed all the 32 releases some thime ago, after the label had gone - Little Red's Fantasy & Moontrane are fantastic, Iron Man (is this the most out album he made as leader?) and the Berlin as well as his demo-session (the one with Joe Henderson, Larry Young, Herbie Hancock etc) are personal favorites, as is the Mosaic.

    Muse/32 had some nice dates with Woody as sideman:

    - Louis Hayes: The Real Thing (with René McLean, Ronnie Mathews, Stafford James & Slide Hampton)

    - Roy Brooks: The Free Slave (with George Coleman & Hugh Lawson)

    Then a nice and probably not too well known CD:

    Louis Hayes - Woody Shaw Quintet / Lausanne 1977

    Woody Shaw - t/flh

    René McLean - ts/ss/fl

    Ronnie Mathews - p

    Stafford Hames - b

    Louis Hayes - d

    In Case You Haven't Heard (Shaw) 15:25

    Moontrane (Shaw) 15:39

    Contemplation (Shorter-arr. Mathews) 8:08 (omit horns)

    Jean-Marie (Mathews) 13:35

    Bilad As Sudan (McLean) 19:16

    Recorded live at Salle d'Epalinges, Lausanne, Switzerland, February 4, 1977.

    ubu

  7. no need to try, as I'm very much into some local beers (a tradition, which, hélas!, has been slowly but surely decaying over the last years in switzerland), and some other european ones.

    How about a nice ol' Leffe?

    Or some Jever?

    Then, of course, there are some moments in life, where nothing but a Guiness is right...

    ubu

  8. The Bright One:

    De Franco (cl), Clark (p), Wright (B), White (d):

    April 7, 1954:

    Cable Car

    Yesterdays

    Lover Man

    Jack the Fielstalker

    Deep Purple

    If I Should Lose You

    August 9, 1954:

    Titoro

    Mine

    Now's The Time

    Gerry's Tune

    August 10, 1954:

    Laura

    I'll Remember April

    The Bright One

    September 1, 1954:

    A Foggy Day

    What Can I Say Dear

    ---

    The title track is not in its chronological place, but at the end of the CD.

    brownie: Past Perfect also has some licensed stuff (several Candid albums, I bought some of these lately). So they're not purely a rip-off, it seems. Not that they produce too nice CDs, but at least you can get some good music at a nice price... (I got the Russell/Hawk, Don Ellis & Clark Terry Candid albums in their Past Perfect reincarnations)

    ubu

  9. re Donald Byrd: yes, it is that one paired with Grant Green´s

    Hope your friend will find many RVG at 9€ in Madrid Rock

    EKE: hope my friend has a large enough CD allowance...

    Have to find that Green/Byrd date. Think it's still around.

    ubu

  10. Herbie time again...

    first, here is the link where you can find our first broadcast. Thanks for your interest. It was, as a whole (and being our first time live on air) quite successful, I'd say. I'm by the way not the guy announcing Watermelon Man (which we had played already) instead of Maiden Voyage... ;)

    Click the loudspeaker-symbol to access the programme.

    ***********************

    Then, here comes part two: next sunday, we'll present the Sextet. The albums from which we'll include music are:

    - The Prisoner (Blue Note, 1969. Johnny Coles, Garnett Brown, Joe Henderson, Buster Williams, Al Heath, woodwinds)

    - Fat Albert Rotunda (Warner, 1969. same, funk band on two tracks)

    - Mwandishi (Warner, 1970. Eddie Henderson, Julian Priester, Bennie Maupin, Buster Williams, Billy Hart; guitar & perc. added)

    - Crossings (Warner, 1971. same, voices, perc and synths added)

    - Sextant (Columbia, 1972. same, synths & perc added)

    In my opinion, these are all killer albums. Maybe The Prisoner is the one I like most - the sound of that band is such a beautiful one, Coles, Brown and Hernderson play one great solo after the other...

    Sextant, then, to me, seems the most forward-looking album of these, incredible textures and sounds!

    What are your opinions? Let's not stick to "what should I play in my show" only - rather I'd like to start a general discussion of these albums.

    Is there any comparable music around, by the way?

    ubu

  11. then, I might have to add that I am a fan of at least some of the late Miles - Tutu, Amandla and also Siesta (besides the pre-Miller stuff, or the albums Miller was on as a sideman, as opposed to arranger/composer/mastermind).

    The track "Portia" from Tutu is, in my opinion, one of the highlights of Miles' comeback years.

    ubu

  12. Anyone in for Lambert Hendricks & Bavan at Newport '63?

    Of course also "Sing a Song of Basie" - a classic.

    Re. writing lyrics for songs (not vocalese): anyone heard Susanne Abbuehl? For her ECM debut "April" she wrote lyrics to some Carla Bley compositions (and music to some e.e.cummings poems). A very beautiful, very slow and moody album. I also saw her life once. She started out solo, in a quite big hall. She's got a presence that really grabs you. Somehow she succeeds in keeping up suspense without doing anything fast. And her band (clarinet/bass clarinet, piano/harmonium, drums/percussion) does the soloing in pretty the same fashion - not minimalistic at all, but much textures and colours. Beautiful stuff, highly recommended!

    ubu

  13. Chiming in a little late...

    I like Aura, and I think the comparison with the Music for Brass recordings are useful. The writing of Mikkelborg is quite special (I don't have anything else by him, cannot compare), and the soloing is fine, too. The whole album, in my opinion, stands as one of the high points of late Miles.

    Then, to add a little more spice to the discussion: the Evans link was not revived by Aura, but rather by Tutu. With this, I mean to say that Miller, with all his electronics and programming was somehow able to provide very similar backgrounds for Miles' still beautiful sound and improvations - of course these backgrounds (as was always Miles' want) were of a contemporary form (the Quincy Jones Evans re-creation is a rather drab affair, if you ask me - not the kind of nostalgia to fit Miles' image), and the musical connection was achieved by totally different means.

    But Miller somehow read Miles' mind - as in the late fifties did Gil Evans.

    Does this make sense to anyone else, here?

    ubu

  14. I think I've saved that other discography in my home computer. Anyone interested drop me a PM, don't forget your emai-address, then I'll mail it (it's a huge word-file)

    ubu

    this should be the link: www.achilles.net/~howardm/tsmonk/tsmonk2.php - maybe it comes back...

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