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So, What Are You Listening To NOW?


JSngry

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Scratching an itch for Duke with some small group recordings of Ellingtonians with Britons on board as well.

Johnny Hodges - Ray Nance - Keith Christie “Homage To The Duke” Esquire/Solid Records Japan

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11 hours ago, jazzbo said:

I have only listened for a few hours. But there is a bit more bass right now, which is nice. Things are a bit more complicated than I just need more bass. It's all about a balance throughout the system and specifically how the rectifier and the output tubes "work" together. 

This is a newly "improved" version of my favorite rectifier so far, and there is improvement. And it's the same manufacturer as the output tubes, and the rectifier it is replacing was designed to work well with those.

You must be driving your amp hard if you are actually hearing audible differences in your choice of tubes for your rectifier. In guitar amps, people swap these tubes to soften the highs and it's usually only noticeable when driving the output tubes very hard.

https://www.andertons.co.uk/rectifier-amp-guide

Edited by bresna
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2 hours ago, bresna said:

You must be driving your amp hard if you are actually hearing audible differences in your choice of tubes for your rectifier. In guitar amps, people swap these tubes to soften the highs and it's usually only noticeable when driving the output tubes very hard.

https://www.andertons.co.uk/rectifier-amp-guide

Not true in my case Kevin. I have always heard audible differences in rectifier in my amps regardless of levels. These are NOT guitar amps. I have those too, been using them for guitar and bass for decades. Different animals, though rectifier tube differences can be heard in these as well when not driven into distortion levels, though more subtle.  

I'm not alone in hearing these differences in types and brands in these amps. In the Decware community it is a common experience, and with other tube amplifier owners as well. Rectifier characteristics are especially easy to hear in amps with tube voltage regulation I find. Mine for the last fifteen years have had tube voltage regulation for input tubes or both input and output tubes.

Edited by jazzbo
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David Sanchez “Travesia” Columbia cd

Alto Saxophone – Miguel Zenon
Bass – Hans Glawischnig
Drums – Antonio Sanchez
Percussion, Congas – Pernell Saturnino
Piano – Edsel Gomez
Producer, Tenor Saxophone – David Sánchez

I really like the way Sanchez incorporates Latin elements into his work.

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FOLLOWED BY

Another David Sanchez from around the same time. What a band!

David Sanchez “The Departure” Columbia cd

Bass – Andy Gonzalez, Peter Washington

Drums – Leon Parker

Percussion – Milton Cardona

Piano – Danilo Perez

Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone – David Sanchez

Trumpet – Tom Harrell

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Edited by jazzbo
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4 hours ago, Rabshakeh said:

Did you enjoy this one? I'm really enjoying Courvoisier at the moment, but don't know this record.

Leandre is always a sell.

It's excellent; a true group effort. It might be the first place I heard Courvoisier. 

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2 minutes ago, jlhoots said:

Try Game Of Chance if you can find it.

Yep, I've got it.  It's another dandy Margitza record. :tup

 

 

 

Now streaming:

Miyazawa Akira – Bull Trout (Victor Japan, 1969)

Tenor Saxophone, Percussion – Akira Miyazawa
Piano, Percussion – Masahiko Satoh
Bass – Yasuo Arakawa
Drums, Percussion – Masahiko Togashi
Percussion – Yohnosuke Segami (1 trk only)

 

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Michael_Franks_Watching_the_Snow_CD.jpg.27982ad16da07f9ff150b00383595577.jpg

I've only discovered Michael Franks recently. I'm not a huge fan, but I really can't believe how much his stuff was ripped off by so many of those British Columbia indie bands that Pitchfork Media so desperately wanted to marry in the 00s, without anyone ever mentioning his name.

That Kaputt album by Dan Bejar was a particular example.

Edited by Rabshakeh
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Next up:

Akira Miyazawa Quartet – Kiso (Victor JP, 1970)

This album was made less than a year after Bull Trout, and the band members are the same -- except from the drummer.  Takeo Moriyama replaces Masahiko Togashi -- and his propulsive, frenetic drumming definitely alters the trajectory of the music.

 

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1 hour ago, Teasing the Korean said:

 

  • Hubler & Schwab - Vampyros Lesbos

When I was a kid, Channel 4 in the UK used to show art house or foreign films on a Friday evening, chosen and introduced by the film critic Mark Kermode (still going).

As a teenaged boy in a pre-internet era, these Friday night foreign and arthouse films were one of the few reliable sources of (ahem) "intellectual stimulation" that was available.

You would have Kermode and his quiff talking for 15 minutes, inevitably something about how the film you were about to see recontextualised and reframed modes of alienation through its subversively marxist use of mise-en-scene, and then you'd finally get onto what you were watching for, which was sub-titles and generous pubic carpetry. 

Anyway, Vampyros Lesbos was typical of Kermode's highly intellectual choices (presumably the producers knew their audience). 

I remember watching it and being really impressed by the soundtrack (even if it failed to live up to its name when it came to the amount of full frontal 'mise-en-scene' shown).

I'm going to track it down. Thanks for the reminder.

Edited by Rabshakeh
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5 minutes ago, Rabshakeh said:

When I was a kid, Channel 4 in the UK used to show art house or foreign films on a Friday evening, chosen and introduced by the film critic Mark Kermode (still going).

As a teenaged boy in a pre-internet era, these Friday night foreign and arthouse films were one of the few reliable sources of (ahem) "intellectual stimulation" that was available.

You would have Kermode and his quiff talking for 15 minutes, inevitably something about how the film you were about to see recontextualised and reframed modes of alienation through its subversively marxist use of mise-en-scene, and then you'd finally get onto what you were watching for, which was sub-titles and generous pubic carpetry. 

Anyway, Vampyros Lesbos was typical of Kermode's highly intellectual choices (presumably the producers knew their audience). 

I remember watching it and being really impressed by the soundtrack (even if it failed to live up to its name when it came to the amount of full frontal 'mise-en-scene' shown).

I'm going to track it down. Thanks for the reminder.

Ha ha!  Brilliantly described!

There are two versions of Vampyros Lesbos - one with 14 tracks and one with 17.  I have the CD with 14 tracks, but then bought the other three as lossless downloads from Qobuz.  Try to get the longer version if you can find it.  The tracks feature unusual juxtapositions of funk beats, brass, sitars, and wordless vocals.  I never get tired of it, but at the same time, I generally only listen in October.

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