Hardbopjazz

What are some jazz sound tracks from movies that you like?

44 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, paul secor said:

That was a movie where they would have been better off letting Bird play Bird rather than having Niehaus play Bird.

I thought all the Parker solos on the soundtrack of "Bird" were actual Parker solos taken from recordings, with new rhythm section work by contemporary studio guys (e.g. drummer John Guerin). The score for the film was otherwise the work of Niehaus, but I don't think that he played in place of Parker on the soundtrack.

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"The West Coast film music featured I found painful to listen to, because all the soloists who improvised or played melodies, played with this horrible, corny-assed vibrato that made me want to puke."

If you were referring to David Raksin's soundtrack for "Too Late Blues" -- which along with "The Hustler" is the only soundtrack on the album that stems from the West Coast ("Satan in High Heels" features NYC-based musicians) -- then you're saying that Benny Carter (alto saxophone soloist on the soundtrack) 
"played with this horrible, corny-assed vibrato that made [you] want to puke"?

 

And the trumpeter is Uan Rasey, perhaps best known for his work here:
 


 

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21 hours ago, optatio said:

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VARIOUS: ORIGINAL SOUND TRACK RECORDING OF 'ALL NIGHT LONG'. EPIC LA 16032 [1962]

That one has been on one of our TV channels recently and I recorded it. Mingus appears right at the beginning of the film, short but sweet.

Not to forget either Tubby Hayes, Jimmy Deuchar and Alan Ganley’s feature in ‘Dr Terror’s House of Horrors’.

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1 hour ago, Larry Kart said:

I thought all the Parker solos on the soundtrack of "Bird" were actual Parker solos taken from recordings, with new rhythm section work by contemporary studio guys (e.g. drummer John Guerin). The score for the film was otherwise the work of Niehaus, but I don't think that he played in place of Parker on the soundtrack.

You're probably right, Larry. It's been so long since I saw the film that I'd forgotten how the music was done. Bird's solos with a different rhythm section sounds right. Actually, it doesn't sound "right", but that's evidently what was done.

Edited by paul secor

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Round Midnight

Blow Up

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Thanks to all,now this old man has some people to commiserate with.

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5 hours ago, Larry Kart said:

"The West Coast film music featured I found painful to listen to, because all the soloists who improvised or played melodies, played with this horrible, corny-assed vibrato that made me want to puke."

If you were referring to David Raksin's soundtrack for "Too Late Blues" -- which along with "The Hustler" is the only soundtrack on the album that stems from the West Coast ("Satan in High Heels" features NYC-based musicians) -- then you're saying that Benny Carter (alto saxophone soloist on the soundtrack) 
"played with this horrible, corny-assed vibrato that made [you] want to puke"?

 

And the trumpeter is Uan Rasey, perhaps best known for his work here:
 


 

Who knows what goes on in the choices they make for film soundtracks. Maybe DR told them to play the melody like that, maybe a film executive told them to play it like that, maybe Cassavettes wanted it like that, maybe it was the musician's choice.

All I know is that I have the original Dot recording of DR's music for that and other film music he wrote, and it sounded nothing like that.

In the case of the Dot record, it was not from the film; it was Raksin's LP, so everything is exquisite. The New Wave II album has many versions of that, and the only one they used in the film was that horrific version where they got some opera singer to vocalise the melody!

They played that twice- the recording studio scene, and the corny ending scene where Stella Stevens returns to Ghost (Bobby Darin) and the group when they're playing in that club.

You can hear Uan Rasey doesn't use that schmaltzy vibrato on the Chinatown Theme (which I hear as Goldsmith's homage to the great DR).

Sure, he does use some vibrato, but not that fast, tasteless vibrato he uses on TLB, which makes me feel like I'm playing a wedding gig with some fat, smelly trumpet player with a waxed moustache playing Peg of My Heart 100x in a row.

6 hours ago, sidewinder said:

That one has been on one of our TV channels recently and I recorded it. Mingus appears right at the beginning of the film, short but sweet.

Not to forget either Tubby Hayes, Jimmy Deuchar and Alan Ganley’s feature in ‘Dr Terror’s House of Horrors’.

maxresdefault.jpg

That was a great segment of that anthology. The trumpet player/leader of the group stole some sacred voodoo melody, and arranged it for his jazz combo. When he performed it at the jazz club, the voodoo gods were not happy...:alien:

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I never thought of The Hustler as being a West Coast film, because it used all East Coast musicians on the soundtrack- Roswell Rudd, Phil Woods, Billy Bauer, Kenny Davern and Jimmy Cleveland- but it was filmed in both LA and NY.

They probably recorded the music at Edison Studios in NYC. Hopkins used Woods on another film he scored, 'Lilith', which had some nice sax session things with Woods playing lead alto.

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More from France:

Martial Solal score for A Bout de Souffle

Duke Jordan/K Dorham/BWilen score for Un Témoin dans la Ville

 

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On 2/2/2018 at 8:45 PM, sgcim said:

I never thought of The Hustler as being a West Coast film, because it used all East Coast musicians on the soundtrack- Roswell Rudd, Phil Woods, Billy Bauer, Kenny Davern and Jimmy Cleveland- but it was filmed in both LA and NY.

They probably recorded the music at Edison Studios in NYC. Hopkins used Woods on another film he scored, 'Lilith', which had some nice sax session things with Woods playing lead alto.

Sorry -- you're right about "The Hustler."

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I've never seen the movie and really have no interest in seeing it, but the soundtrack CD was an excellent compilation disc.  This was my first exposure to these Johnny Hartman tracks and spurred me to eventually track down the Bee Hive album they came from and then, of course, to finally get the Mosaic Bee Hive set last year.

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On 1/31/2018 at 3:35 PM, JSngry said:

Yeah, and I'd like to hear the actual soundtrack itself, if it still exists!

Anybody seen "They Saved Hitler's Brain"? The opening minutes, obviously done years after the original film was in the can, have a free-jazzish Rhodes thing going on that is not in the least unpleasant. I've yet to find out who did THAT music.

Ah, Jim, one of my very favorite lousy movies! I *think* some of the music was by Don Hewlett, who was an electronic composer, and I'm pretty sure it did come from the 1963 original, but there was definitely stuff added in the 70s that definitely does sound "Rhodes-ish"! They Saved Hitler's Brain

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I wrote elsewhere about my love for what I call "Twilight Zone jazz."  

Here are some examples:

 

 

 

 

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Good music on this one: Sharky's Machine

 

 

gregmo

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