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Hardbopjazz

Steps you take to protect your vinyl.

30 posts in this topic

Back when vinyl was the only option and all my music was on vinyl, I use to keep all my albums in a paper sleeve made of cellophane/plastic. I would then put the record back into the cardboard album cover. Is it worth doing this? How are others protecting the collection? I also would use a soft felt brush to wipe the dust away before playing the record. 

 

Image result for cellophane to protect vinyl records  

Image result for cellophane to protect vinyl records

Image result for a felt brush to clean vinyl records

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I have special inner sleeves for some records but not all.  At the very least, I will replace the old sleeves with archival paper sleeves.  

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I purchased "rice paper" sleeves in bulk from my pressing plant to use on my collection.

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Bozo festival going on there.

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Nonetheless, they have suggestions you can ponder. 

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9 hours ago, Chuck Nessa said:

Bozo festival going on there.

Pretty typical. The snake oil usually follows closely.

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I would not put the sleeves with the records back into the album cover. Doing this causes wear on the cover edges eventually resulting in split edges.

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5 minutes ago, Stonewall15 said:

I would not put the sleeves with the records back into the album cover. Doing this causes wear on the cover edges eventually resulting in split edges.


A problem (also including ring wear) specific to cardboard US covers of yesteryear with fairly seedy paper strips round the cover edges to hold everything together. Much less of a problem with European LP covers.

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At this point, all I do is try not to drop them or handle them while or immediately after eating fried chicken. Even if you don't touch the plaing surface, good grease is hard to stop.

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I prefer paper inner sleeves with rounded corners. They are easier to get back in the cover, especially on labels where the cover seems to be a bit too small for the record (Contemporary and Savoy).

I do not use outer plastic sleeves except for ten inch records, records where the cover is hopelessly split open, and collector-mania records (original Blue Notes). 

Edited by kh1958

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I'm re-sleeving everything with 2.5 mil archival outer sleeves (5 mil on more fragile covers). About halfway done on 5k+ records. Inners are a mixture, although inners in lesser condition tend to get thrown out and replaced with new poly-lined sleeves. Projects like this are fun because I am reminded of some things I hadn't listened to in a while, and some things that could stand to be re-homed.

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PVC outer sleeving on most of mine, usually store the LPs/inners out of the cover at the back. Second the comment about old US LPs being prone to splits if you store the LP in the sleeve.

After that I sprinkle them with Holy Water and bless them.

Edited by sidewinder

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depends on the record and cover as far as storing outside of the jacket. Some of the more fragile jackets get such treatment.

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I like rice paper sleeves, but if I buy a used record and it sounds crackly even after cleaning it, I see no point in pampering it with a good sleeve.

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The most important thing i have always done is to ALWAYS, really ALWAYS handle my LPs with only the thumb against the outermost rim and 2 or 3 more fingers near the center hole on the label, never ever touch the surface with my bare fingers when pulling the record out of the sleeve or holding it to put it on the turntable etc. And it makes me cringe and almost cry out with disgust at the fleamarkets when I see so-called vinyl lovers (browsing through my vinyl crate) ineptly grab my LPs with their thick, fat clumsy fingers not just near the edge but right on both sides of outer surface of the actual grooves! Fingers that at the stall before may have grabbed rusty gardening tools or whatever ...
And when you very politely, in a very low voice call them to order they react as if it was the most natural thing in the world to handle vinyl leaving their fingerprints all over the place ...
As if it was sooo difficult always to practise a (piano) "octave grip" when handling an LP!! And I do take care to always put my LPs in inner sleeves that are not such a tight fit that you have to force the LP out of the sleeve. The LP ought to slip out of the sleeve by itself when turning and handling the cover properly.

As for inner sleeves, of course I prefer those with inner clear plastic liners. And if it is just paper sleeves they really ought to be as smooth inside as possible.
P.S: I have seen the wood glue trick (see video above) demonstrated to me. Unbelievable but it seems to work.
And believe it or not - a collector friend (quite finicky about getting the best out of his original 45s) uses a method that involves adding some WD40! No kidding .. Haven't tried it myself but what he demonstrated to me sounded (literally) convincing. Will have to inquire again ...

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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I tried the wood glue trick on a really cheap and really filthy record that was something I wanted to play but ended up getting a sealed copy of later. Its a messy method, used a lot of wood glue and had moderate results. Wasn't worth the effort imo. I talked a bit about it in the cleaning records thread. 

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I'm using the sleeves with clear plastic liners. If I purchase a record that has a paper sleeve I discard it in favor of the plastic liner sleeve. Of course, I keep the paper sleeve if it has some printed information on it about the record, etc. 

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Recently I had my MC cartridge retipped, it may sounds obvious but an old MC cartridge, even if the stylus has few hours, needs a new suspension in order to work well. I noted it because before retipping my records sounded much worse then I remembered. So cleaning records is fine, but if the analog rig is not in order the records may seem much worn then they are.

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16 minutes ago, porcy62 said:

Recently I had my MC cartridge retipped, it may sounds obvious but an old MC cartridge, even if the stylus has few hours, needs a new suspension in order to work well. I noted it because before retipping my records sounded much worse then I remembered. So cleaning records is fine, but if the analog rig is not in order the records may seem much worn then they are.

I recently replaced the cartridge because it hadn't been replaced in a long time. I brought it to the dealer I bought the turntable from as he said it's a bit tricky to do yourself.  

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1 minute ago, Brad said:

I recently replaced the cartridge because it hadn't been replaced in a long time. I brought it to the dealer I bought the turntable from as he said it's a bit tricky to do yourself.  

Not really tricky, but you must have a firm hand, a good sight and few specific tools, damaging it it's easy so I prefer the dealer doing it.

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