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What else is similar/related to the Tristano/Konitz/Marsh Atlantic Mosaic? (1960's or earlier)

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Here is a very neglected album of "Tristano Music.' It gives you a chance to hear three Tristanoites play some great swinging music and some wonderful improvisations. Pity that Ronnie Ball, Willie Dennis and Ted Brown (who is still alive AFAIK) did not make more music ... Dennis is the real surprise here. This is well worth acquiring.
Edited by garthsj
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Excellent album. And Ted Brown is still with us at age 94 and playing well too in terms of ideas, though at times one might wish he could get more air through the horn. His most recent album is definitely worth checking out:

41kXjZLIPwL._AC_UY218_.jpg

Ted is the first soloist on these:
 

 

BTW, his daughter Anita is a terrific composer. This album, her only one so far, is quite something. There are other links to her work on You Tube.

517F11sJyqL._AC_UY218_.jpg
 

 

41kXjZLIPwL._AC_UY218_.jpg

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Perhaps a little off topic, but very good.

Pound Cake

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Thanks for this recommendation, Larry. I am just coming out  of covid-19/researcher/author hibernation (I got both of my shots)

and missed this one. I can now resume my life as a full-time jazz fan until my editors start demanding yet another edition. I need to retire - so much jazz to listen to, so little time left!

 

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Why did Tristano play so much with the quite obscure Sonny Dallas and Nick Stabulas ? Who were they and has someone any idea why Lennie Tristano choose them so often in the 60´s. 
I have a quite rare album of Tristano "Descent into the Maelstrom" and the last two tracks from 1966 are with those two on bass and drums, I must admit I heard much better drummers 

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9 hours ago, garthsj said:
R-4990455-1381520935-5163.jpeg.jpg
 
This recent compilation album contains a collection of Lee's early recordings. These are essential recordings, and contain some of the greatest improvisations you will ever hear. These recordings established Konitz as a unique voice in modern jazz. The two early albums he recorded for George Wein"s Storyville label are also essential to following his development.

Except it's on the American Jazz Classics (gray/PD label out of Spain) label so who knows where the heck they got this material.

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22 minutes ago, bresna said:

Except it's on the American Jazz Classics (gray/PD label out of Spain) label so who knows where the heck they got this material.

Muzak of Japan released these (I believe legitimately) on a 2 cd set last year that sounds wonderful.

konitz_lee~_leekonitz_103b.jpg

https://www.dustygroove.com/item/948926?sf=Lee+Konitz&incl_oos=1&incl_cs=1&kwfilter=Lee+Konitz&sort_order=artist

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12 hours ago, jlhoots said:

Perhaps a little off topic, but very good.

Pound Cake

an excellent Ted Brown

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12 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

Why did Tristano play so much with the quite obscure Sonny Dallas and Nick Stabulas ? Who were they and has someone any idea why Lennie Tristano choose them so often in the 60´s. 
I have a quite rare album of Tristano "Descent into the Maelstrom" and the last two tracks from 1966 are with those two on bass and drums, I must admit I heard much better drummers 

Dallas  was a good one IMO, a very determined sober walker, if you know what I mean. Stabulus is another story, a mixed bag. Perhaps the most Blakey-like of non-Blakey drummers -- that side of him pays great dividends of on the excellent Al Cohn/Bob Brookmeyer album on Coral (see below); an album BTW that makes it clear that Nick needed to be recorded just so, rather crisply I would say -- he also was not unlike Art Taylor, of whom the same could be said. OTOH, there was a kind of loose "crash/bang" aspect to Nick at times that could be annoying. Phil Woods and Al and Zoot favored him IIRC.

51vjvXObnZL._AC_UY218_.jpg

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22 hours ago, Larry Kart said:

Dallas  was a good one IMO, a very determined sober walker, if you know what I mean. Stabulus is another story, a mixed bag. Perhaps the most Blakey-like of non-Blakey drummers -- that side of him pays great dividends of on the excellent Al Cohn/Bob Brookmeyer album on Coral (see below); an album BTW that makes it clear that Nick needed to be recorded just so, rather crisply I would say -- he also was not unlike Art Taylor, of whom the same could be said. OTOH, there was a kind of loose "crash/bang" aspect to Nick at times that could be annoying. Phil Woods and Al and Zoot favored him IIRC.

51vjvXObnZL._AC_UY218_.jpg

Thank you very much for your answer. Yes, I also noticed that kind of loose "crash-bang" aspect to Nick, especially on those tracks from Descent to Maelstroem. I think "Stretch" is the title of the faster tune, that seems to be based on "You Stepped Out of A Dream".....

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Overall on the recording scene of the 50s Nick Stabulas wasn't that rare a name in the line-ups, though. So I don't think the "obscure" tag fits him.

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On 2/26/2021 at 0:26 AM, jlhoots said:

Perhaps a little off topic, but very good.

Pound Cake

YES.

I need to get Jazz of New Cities. Have most of his other CDs and was lucky to see him play a number of times (hope that happens again). The first time, maybe in 2012 or early 2013, I felt like it was the closest I could get to seeing Lester Young in performance. 

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