Niko

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About Niko

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    Funktastic!!
  • Birthday 04/29/1981

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  1. the book's promotional website is still up btw https://sites.google.com/site/sqjazzband/ (for some reason it's in English even though there is no English edition afaik)
  2. Let's say it like this: I don't regret getting it at all even though my French is so poor that I wouldn't want to really judge the book... the author went into the records of the california prison system (and similar sources) to dig up what they had about a group of musicians who were active in a prison band in San Quentin in the early 60s - and they had a lot. Trumpeters Nat Meeks and Dupree Bolton, altoists Frank Morgan, Art Pepper and Earl Anderza, pianist Jimmy Bunn all get a chapter and there are also some general chapters... at 350 pages it's a sizeable document and the type of information (endless cycles of arrests, releases, probabation violations...) I haven't seen in this (or a comparable) level of detail in other books about the era - even though they evidently were an important part of the jazz life at the time... Ted Gioia's West Coast Jazz book is certainly the more essential book about this period (because it's broader and says more about the music) and there are, of course, also quite a few autobiographies which touch upon similar topics, addiction and the jazz life in California ca 1960 (Art Pepper and Hampton Hawes come to mind, two of the big autobiographies in jazz, also Roy Porter...)... but I would still say that this book has a lot of unique information and gives you a perspective that the other books don't have, looking with information from both sides at the interactions between the jazz musicians and the legal system edit: reading a bit in it, maybe the image I give above slighlty one-sided... it's not just legal records but also concert reviews from the prison newspaper that went into the book - and various other sources for the times these people spent out of prison....
  3. well, there are those two albums, Katanga and The Fox. Then there's the stuff in the Onzy Matthews Select, some tracks with Matthews (one or two solos) and that abandoned Pacific Jazz Session (two tracks). The latter session is also on the Bolton Uptown CD... That cd also contains a session of an Oklahoma prison band and a live session of the Katanga band that's also on youtube, e.g. this track then there's the album of that Oklahoma prison band (this one) which is distinct from the material on the Uptown cd... I don't have this but I dimly remember I once found samples that sounded like bits of Bolton on there... and finally there's the question of possible 1940s recordings which is analyzed in a really nice document here, arguing that quite a bit of what used to be attributed to Bolton comes from an even more obscure early bop trumpeter (Willis Nelson)... it's not much but it's not nothing either...
  4. when I was searching for samples from that album a few weeks ago, I ended up here
  5. living as a foreigner in the same country, I must say that I am really happy with how vaccinations went here... yes, the start was a bit slow, but I kept telling my friends that we will catch up because our healthcare system (with all its well-known faults) is designed to do a great job at something like this - and I'd argue that this is what we saw over the past few months... got my certificate of being two weeks past the second shot today, it's all in the same official app for everyone and if you need a pdf to print that's two minutes of extra work... and this idea of letting youngsters go clubbing or on holidays right after their first vaccine shot (of Johnson&Johnson, so only one shot needed "dansen met Jansen")... had its drawbacks (as seen in the current infection numbers) but I am guardedly optimistic that it did motivate quite a few 19 year olds to get that shot as quickly as possible ... so when I will be back to teaching in September it will hopefully be to a class of vaccinated kids or even young adults... [my friend tells this story of how his kid who'd been mildly skeptic of all the policies got the shot just so he could walk around the house saying "you can't tell me anything, I am vaccinated"... in the end, it's not the reasons that count][home in Germany, I am slightly worried that they lost the chance to get the 19 year olds on track for unrestricted, vaccinated summer holidays - which still seems to be the best motivation for this demographic]
  6. what I found a bit puzzling when I read this yesterday (great read!) was that there was no reference to the San Quentin Jazz Band book by Pierre Briancon... I know it's in French... but it does have a 50 page chapter on Dupree Bolton with many additional details (arrest records being a major additional source)
  7. in my case, youtube went right into Togashi's Face of Percussion album after that track which was right on target for me right now...
  8. Like I wrote, I didn't buy Rings because normally solo albums by drummer don't work for me at all (so, in particular, I only know it from the little that's on youtube)... but with Togashi, stuff that otherwise wouldn't work seems to work for me... you get into this Zen mode [or, your best imitation of a Zen mode] and the music is just so good...
  9. this is such a good album, kicking myself for not getting Rings which was available at the same time... but at least I got this one and it's great... and I do agree it's the kind of album one tends to forget (as a matter of fact, a significant fraction of the Kikuchi and Togashi cds is permanently stored on top of the cd player, partly due to space restrictions, but partly because it's always good to have the reminder )
  10. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    Rene Costy - Expectancy even though it's somewhat outside the scope of that Euro modernism thread, this is the record that the thread really brought back into my mind (bought it a year ago or so) ... and on some level, this is all about Euro modernism... and it's nice to finally see the face of someone whose claims to fame are a (large) handful of those anonymous library albums... and compared to that vast KPM catalogue TTK posted today, it's also kind of nice to have a curated 2CD compilation of the tracks that might still be of interest (the leader himself on violin I suppose)
  11. KPM 1000 Series on iTunes

    They're 75% of the international series: https://www.emipm.com/en/browse/labels/KPMINT
  12. KPM 1000 Series on iTunes

    I've spent the past minutes trying to figure out that discography and it seems it's an alternative version of Indo-Jazz Suite (see here)
  13. KPM 1000 Series on iTunes

    Wow, thanks for the heads up! went straight to the KPM international series which has John Mayer Indo-Jazz Interpolation and then those Clarke Boland albums...