Jump to content

What vinyl are you spinning right now??


wolff

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 55.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • sidewinder

    5303

  • paul secor

    4123

  • clifford_thornton

    3883

  • jeffcrom

    2810

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

1 hour ago, Rabshakeh said:

Oh. What are the shades? That he could still do it at that point? Was Henderson perceived to have sold out?

I think Mark was just pointing out that the are certain common organizational points in Joe's solo here and the one on Live In Japan. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Rabshakeh said:

Alphonse Mouzon - By All Means.

I don't understand why this isn't more famous. A great jazz funk record. 

I'll hazard a couple guesses:

Being released on MPS probably didn't help... at least in the U.S., where it was issued by PAUSA, a relatively small-time outfit.

Also, wasn't this sort of musical style beginning to lose steam by the beginning of the 80s?  I think the conservative, "Let's turn the clock back to the mid-60s" thing was already ascendant.  So funky music -- unless it was the "original" Horace Silver-type funk -- was becoming passe (in some circles).  So, ironically, it was going out of style because it wasn't old enough.

 

 

EDIT: Noodling on this a bit further. I love the idea that, with passing of time, what was hip or popular (or the opposite) at any given time can be re-visited and re-evaluated without the baggage that may have gone with it at the time of its release.  Time can provide a sort of leveling effect; in other words, the music can be recontextualized with the passing of time, with different times yielding different meanings. So music that may have been ignored can be lifted up, and music that was lionized may prove less durable than expected. At the very least, things get shifted around, meaning-wise; so, if the art is good enough -- and so much of jazz is -- it's continually, kaleidoscopically becoming something new and vital. 

I hope that makes sense. 😉

 

Edited by HutchFan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, HutchFan said:

I'll hazard a couple guesses:

Being released on MPS probably didn't help... at least in the U.S., where it was issued by PAUSA, a relatively small-time outfit.

Also, wasn't this sort of musical style beginning to lose steam by the beginning of the 80s?  I think the conservative, "Let's turn the clock back to the mid-60s" thing was already ascendant.  So funky music -- unless it was the "original" Horace Silver-type funk -- was becoming passe (in some circles).  So, ironically, it was going out of style because it wasn't old enough.

 

 

EDIT: Noodling on this a bit further. I love the idea that, with passing of time, what was hip or popular (or the opposite) at any given time can be re-visited and re-evaluated without the baggage that may have gone with it at the time of its release.  Time can provide a sort of leveling effect; in other words, the music can be recontextualized with the passing of time, with different times yielding different meanings. So music that may have been ignored can be lifted up, and music that was lionized may prove less durable than expected. At the very least, things get shifted around, meaning-wise; so, if the art is good enough -- and so much of jazz is -- it's continually, kaleidoscopically becoming something new and vital. 

I hope that makes sense. 😉

 

A perhaps equally salient point is that Alphonse Mouzon never gained traction as a leader in the US marketplace.

Why that is, I couldn't tell you. Management, personal style, bad breath, I do not know. But after his early 70s BN albums...not a lot of noise afterward

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, jazzcorner said:

46186714cx.jpg

46186715pz.jpg

I remember I purchased it when it was brand new. First listening to it I was shocked because there was only some french voice and some terrible cracking and the most annoying thing for me then at 17 was that the band had already played the head of "Rifftide" and was into Miles´ solo and this Frenchman still was tellin some stupid stuff about gothic catedrales, fugues of Jean Sebastian Bach and Mozard . But the band is topnotch bop. Miles got almost as much dexterity as Diz or Fats and playes some top bop trumpet.

James Moody is extraordinar here, it almost sounds like a forrunner of Trane in the 60´s or my then favourite of the 70´s Dave Liebman. 

And a fine occasion to hear the fine piano of Tadd Dameron, whom Miles always praised "a very fine piano player". 

The fast numbers are exactly the bop I love, and the ballads are really strong. Davis even announces the tunes which he never did again. But it must have been annyoing that if he is so kind to say "now Don´t Blame Me" and the french MC repeats the title with a french-accentuated English....

49 minutes ago, jazzcorner said:

Columbia 35309 - Woody Shaw " Rosewood" - rec.  1977 - Engineer: Don Puluse

45617608na.jpg

45617611wr.jpg

Another favourite of mine. Carter Jefferson was so strong ! Wonderful music. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/18/2023 at 6:44 PM, mjazzg said:

Nice

MOMBASA Tathagata reviews

Mombasa - Tathagata [Wind Records, Germany 1980]

I don't know if this band are generaly well known but they're new to me. Lou Blackburn and Carmell Jones was reason enough to invest the £10. Repaying that investment several fold.

They were based in Berlin and touring Germany all the time. I saw them five times, I think, Tom Nicholas was my first conga drum teacher. Frankly, I think none of their albums caught their groove when playing live.

Lou Blackburn and Carmell Jones knew each other from their California days and both were members of Berlin radio big bands for several years, but I think Belgium based trumpeter Doug Lucas fitted better into Mombasa.

Edited by mikeweil
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, JSngry said:

A perhaps equally salient point is that Alphonse Mouzon never gained traction as a leader in the US marketplace.

Why that is, I couldn't tell you. Management, personal style, bad breath, I do not know. But after his early 70s BN albums...not a lot of noise afterward

IIRC  fans and critics in Germany had mixed feelings about his musical directions. He rose to first fame with McCoy Tyner and Weather Report and then turned to funky beats  that others, IMHO, did better. I found his playing in Herbie Hancock's band rather uninspired, too much heavy disco beat. But with those high heeled boots he used to wear he couldn't execute intricate bass drum patterns. His audience here expected more jazz from him, but he did not give them what they wanted. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, mikeweil said:

IIRC  fans and critics in Germany had mixed feelings about his musical directions. He rose to first fame with McCoy Tyner and Weather Report and then turned to funky beats  that others, IMHO, did better. I found his playing in Herbie Hancock's band rather uninspired, too much heavy disco beat. But with those high heeled boots he used to wear he couldn't execute intricate bass drum patterns. His audience here expected more jazz from him, but he did not give them what they wanted. 

I generally don't like Mouzon that much, but I think that as jazz funk goes, this record is very strong. I think it stands out among Mouzon's back catalogue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, mikeweil said:

They were based in Berlin and touring Germany all the time. I saw them five times, I think, Tom Nicholas was my first conga drum teacher. Frankly, I think none of their albums caught their groove when playing live.

Lou Blackburn and Carmell Jones knew each other from their California days and both were members of Berlin radio big bands for several years, butI think Belgium based trumpeter Doug Lucas fitted better into Mombasa.

Interesting, thanks. There's a live album that's on Tidal which first turned me onto them. I can imagine that they were impressive live 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, mjazzg said:

Interesting, thanks. There's a live album that's on Tidal which first turned me onto them. I can imagine that they were impressive live 

Must be this one:

MzktNjAxOC5qcGVn.jpeg

That's the band before Tom joined, but still sounds very lively. Had forgotten about this and just ordered a copy myself.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...