Shrdlu

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About Shrdlu

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    Master of the Groove!

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  1. Not much of value was recorded in the 70s, as far as I'm concerned. The age of development was pretty much over and several top players (e.g. Hancock, Corea, Williams) went into fusion, which, for me, is just a damned noise. I am glad that they were able to make some money from it, though. Herbie wasn't getting rich from his Blue Note albums. Of course, a lot of the main players continued recording, but it was largely music of a retrospective type. Weather Report was an excellent exception, especially my favorite, "Tale Spinnin' ". But jazz, after about 1968, well I'll see you later. To dispel the impression that this is just some old fogey talking, I like the best of house music, which started in the early 80s. That's where it's at now. One can inject a lot of jazz influences into it.
  2. Do you wear a watch?

    My parents got me one when I started high school. It was a cheap windup. Not very accurate: it gave more of a season than a time. Later, I got a "name" watch at one of the Paris, France, airports. It was one of those self-winding models. As with the first one, it told the season rather than the actual time. In the late 80s, my favorite uncle died and his gf sent me his Omega watch. That really surprised me: I set it, and the next day, it was dead on to the second. Quartz. Very nice. You could adjust the hour without altering the minutes or seconds - very handy when crossing time zones. But it was too complex for its own good and died while we were in the Dallas area. I got it fixed, but it cost big bucks. Some internal circuit had malfunctioned. It went O.K. for a few more years and died again. I got it fixed one more time, because it had been my uncle's. Big bucks again. After a while, it died again, and the repair estimate angered me, so into a drawer it went. I got a $10 (quartz) model at a discount grocery store that is just as accurate. So much for Omega. The arrival of Android phones led me to skip the watch. However, I got a genuine German chalet-style cookoo clock for the house. It was made in the Black Forest by some 300-year-old society of cookoo clock makers: this is the real deal. I declined the music box because it only has two tunes. "Deutschland über Alles" would sound good.
  3. Mosaics on Spotify

    I recommend the Oliver Nelson set. It is all high quality. Not every session is a classic, but the average is high, as one might expect. It doesn't include the superb Cannonball "Illumination" session, but that is easy to obtain. It was great that Ollie had a collection of regulars (e.g. Danny Bank) on whom he could call. Those were the days. Most big bands bore me, especially when it's mainly blaring trumpets, but Oliver Nelson wrote for large number of "tone color" instruments - bass clarinet, flutes etc. - and that lifts it well out of the realm of boredom.
  4. Record Store Day - Black Friday 2019

    I hope they make a CD of this. I only recently got the two Tamba 4 albums that were released back in the day. They are very enjoyable.
  5. I obviously tried to add that, but, for some reason, it wouldn't load here. It's like the difficulty loading pics. Anyway, all one has to do is to type in "Benny Goodman Treasure Chest" at Discogs, and all the details are there.
  6. All the details are on Discogs. These recordings are from 1937 and 1938. All the big names (James, Elman, Griffin, Krupa etc.) were still in the band. There is a good story in the notes. One one occasion, the band was "the victim of a masterpiece of bad booking. It was booked into the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City, the then homing place of Guy Lombardo during the winter months. The waiters put their fingers to their ears, and rattled the silver. The Goodman trumpets took up the challenge. On opening night the band got its two-week notice!" That has a French sound to it.
  7. Brach's Halloween Candy

    Brach's? Ewwww.
  8. This set of three LPs (no CD equivalent) is highly recommended. It contains radio broadcasts of the orchestra from the late 30s, with the usual top-notch personnel, particularly Hymie Schertzer on alto saxophone. It has a version of "Mr Bach Goes To Town". My favorite piece is an interesting arrangement of "Honeysuckle Rose" in which the saxophone section plays a counter riff at half tempo.
  9. extensive baby face article

    ¡Gracias por el artículo, Sr Chew! This, as was said, is about as much as we will ever know. What a tragic story. My favorite of the four Blue Note albums is, far and away, "Here 'T'is". I'm not certain why this session had such a great and consistent groove, but it's probably the person and sound of Lou Donaldson. And now, we have an extra track from that session which is of the same high standard. Baby Face uses Freddie Green voicings when comping, where the top note of a chord moves a semitone at the chord change. This is a highly effective technique, simple but powerful. Must chase up the Argo material, no doubt readily available in the Rice Krispie format.
  10. John Coltrane - Blue World

    Very good to have. Anything by the Quartet at this stage is welcome. There is a lack of production. I read online that Impulse was not aware of the session, so Bob Thiele was not involved. There are three takes of "Village Blues". All are equally good and there was no need for another take after the first one. It is too short, and there is no piano solo, but maybe the film guy wanted it that way. The tracks that feature the whole group are much more satisfying. The title track IS "Out Of This World". It has the same extra melody that is on the 1962 original version. Now, let's have the rest of the unissued Trane from 1962 and 1963. It does exist, because there was a radio broadcast of it about 10 years ago.
  11. Bresna said it well. So, Albertson didn't like Keepnews and Weinstock. What else is new? I am tired of hearing what Albertson thought about anything. The fact is, that both Keepnews and Weinstock produced a massive amount of excellent jazz. Take your argument outside, bub.
  12. John Coltrane - Blue World

    Very good to have. Anything by the Quartet at this stage is welcome. There is a lack of production. I suspect that Bob Thiele wasn't involved. There are three takes of "Village Blues". All are equally good and there was no need for another take after the first one. It is too short, and there is no piano solo, but maybe the film guy wanted it that way. The tracks that feature the whole group are much more satisfying. Now, let's have the rest of the unissued Trane from 1962 and 1963. It does exist, because there was a radio broadcast of it about 10 years ago.
  13. Stan Getz and Bill Evans Album on Verve

    I have the Evans Verve book here. If anyone wants to know any details, drop me a message and I will do my best to supply the information.
  14. Stan Getz and Bill Evans Album on Verve

    Ha ha. That's a good one. Thought Elvin was Paul Motian. Were the notes written by an office junior? At the end of the day, bottom line, when all is said and done (insert another overused cliché), I am very grateful to be able to hear these two sessions, and I don't think the music hurts Evans's and Getz's reputations in the slightest. Verve probably left it unreleased for the same reason they didn't issue "Nobody Else But Me" (which has the quartet with Gary Burton): they were pushing Getz playing Bossa Nova. I am annoyed when one man decides not to issue a track, and I'm glad that a different person got access to this material and the two Gil Evans quartet tracks, Cheryl and Ah Moore. I am still hoping that someone (Don Was?) will issue some Blue Note that Michael Cuscuna rejected, especially the large number of unissued Three Sounds performances (how bad could those possibly be?).
  15. Gene Ammons was a big seller for Prestige. However, the Miles albums sold well. It is definitely known that Jimmy Smith saved Blue Note, from 1956 onward. They had gone through the trauma of starting 10" LPs, and then, soon afterward, had to re-tool with 12" LPs. They began recording Jimmy in early 1956 and issued albums quickly. They were, at the time, the only label with B3 recordings in the new style. Alfred even wanted to drop the company and become Jimmy's manager.