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Paul Bley

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3 hours ago, paul secor said:

Some interesting stuff, but I felt that the critic who did a lot of the commentary overestimated Mr. Bley's importance to some degree.

I dunno man, you think you get Keith Jarrett w/o Paul Bley first? The longer I listen, the less I think you do...and I think that Bley swings too. Consistently!

Now, is Keith Jarrett important? Not to you or me personally, but to the world beyond that? Judging my the fees he gets, at least somewhat.

Paul Bley is the kind of guy it's real easy to sleep on until you get woke to him. And then...

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16 hours ago, Simon8 said:

On a unrelated note, always liked that picture of Bley in discussion Bill Evans and Ron Carter. Caption suggestions?

CiUWuxfXEAASmo6.jpg

"Remember when you guys still made non-boring music?  That was a really long time ago"

Edited by Guy Berger

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Looking at Bley's discography on Wikipedia, does anyone know why he appears to have not recorded anything between 1977 and 1983? May be no notable reason, but he recorded fairly regularly before and after that break. Just curious. Cheers. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Bley_discography

 

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It's probably in the autobiography and my copy is in storage. Was he teaching then, perhaps?

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Cheers, i've been wanting to read his book for a while, will track down a copy.

 

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18 hours ago, xybert said:

Looking at Bley's discography on Wikipedia, does anyone know why he appears to have not recorded anything between 1977 and 1983? May be no notable reason, but he recorded fairly regularly before and after that break. Just curious. Cheers. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Bley_discography

 

Bley says he did a recording with Jimmy Guiffre, Lee Konitz and Bill Connors in 1978, which was his "last audio recording for IAI" - the record label he ran with Carol Goss. After that he stopped running the label, he and Goss got married and moved to upstate New York (80s). He appears in Imagine the Sound (1981). [Info from Stopping Time p129-35]

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On 3/30/2018 at 5:07 AM, clifford_thornton said:

It's probably in the autobiography and my copy is in storage. Was he teaching then, perhaps?

Are we talking about "Stopping Time"?   I no longer have my copy but I found it interesting as a fan of Mr Bley but overall disappointing.  Little more than a collection of reminiscences.   

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Out of curiosity just checked that Jazz Centre Society booklet from 1971 and the gig at Hampstead Country Club in London had Annette Peacock on vocals/electric piano, Daryll Runswick on bass and Robert Wyatt on drums. Tunes performed included ‘Mr Joy’ and ‘Touching’ and this was the first of a number of appearances for the JCS over the following years I believe. Review was by Richard Williams.

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35 minutes ago, sidewinder said:

Out of curiosity just checked that Jazz Centre Society booklet from 1971 and the gig at Hampstead Country Club in London had Annette Peacock on vocals/electric piano, Daryll Runswick on bass and Robert Wyatt on drums. Tunes performed included ‘Mr Joy’ and ‘Touching’ and this was the first of a number of appearances for the JCS over the following years I believe. Review was by Richard Williams.

It's line ups like that that make me wish I was ten years older!

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3 hours ago, JohnS said:

Are we talking about "Stopping Time"?   I no longer have my copy but I found it interesting as a fan of Mr Bley but overall disappointing.  Little more than a collection of reminiscences.   

The full title of the book is Stopping Time, Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz. In those terms it is disappointing, in that it sets you up to expect some sort of narrative explaining how Jazz changed into what it is now (and I was disappointed by that). Or at least in 1999, when the book was published. But it doesn't deliver that - rather just being Bley's personal story. The likelihood is the publisher thought up the title (Or anyway the second part - it wouldn't be how an author described himself, rather an outsider's point of view) and stuck him with it in order to enhance sales.

I  actually think the book stands up quite well compared to over-written, over-dramatized Jazz (or music) (auto)-biogs elsewhere. It has more real stuff, somehow. There's quite a lot in it - because Bley did and experienced a lot. Its real value is as testimony  - rather than as analysis. It is just him writing about his life, rather than some grandiose narrative explaining how Jazz got to where it is.

Edited by Simon Weil

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Still not time to stop listening to Paul Bley!

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Never time not to listen to 'Ballads'

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