J.A.W.

Members
  • Content count

    11,062
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by J.A.W.

  1. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    I'll be ordering Mosaics from JazzMessengers again from now on. I was tempted by the pre-order price Mosaic was offering, that's why I ordered the B&W set directly from them, but seeing that JM's price was roughly the same pre-VAT I wish I had ordered it from them and saved me the hassle - and extra cost. Oh well.
  2. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    Mine has just arrived, 5 days after I paid VAT. In my experience it usually takes that long for Dutch Post to receive the item from Customs after VAT and the handling fee have been paid.
  3. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    That's exactly the amount (21% VAT + 4 euros handling fee) I paid on Monday. Dutch Post told me on Monday it would be delivered the next morning: nothing; the next few days the same thing happened. This morning they notified me the set would be delivered tomorrow morning. I'll believe it when I see it...
  4. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    Mosaic outsourced their shipping a few years ago. For European orders they use Asendia, a joint venture launched by French La Poste and Swiss Post, and they (Asendia) cooperate with USPS. European orders are sent in bulk from the US to a central point overseas, from where each order is forwarded to its ultimate destination. To be honest I'm not too impressed with the service Asendia provides, it took a long time for my order to even leave the "processing" stage. Dutch Post informed me that they plan to deliver the set Thursday morning, after some delay. Finally...
  5. Scott Wenzel told me a Freddie Hubbard Mosaic is in the works. No release date yet. It'll be 7 CDs with these Blue Note and impulse! albums: Open Sesame - Blue Note Goin’ Up - Blue Note Hub Cap - Blue Note Ready For Freddie - Blue Note The Artistry Of Freddie Hubbard - impulse! Hub-Tones - Blue Note Here To Stay - Blue Note The Body And The Soul - impulse! Breaking Point - Blue Note Blue Spirits - Blue Note
  6. I also have all the material, but I'll still be buying the set, if only for the upgraded sound - as was the case with the two previous BN Mosaics, the 1960s Mobley and the Henderson; the sound on those two is much better than I've ever heard on earlier releases of the same material,
  7. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    Did you mail Scott directly at scott@mosaicrecords.com ? In my experience he usually replies within a day.
  8. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    I wonder what JazzMessengers' price will be. I usually order my Mosaics from them, but not this time, I thought a direct order from Mosaic might be a bit cheaper (even with the Customs charges) and faster; unfortunately, my order is still "processing"...
  9. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    No notice here yet, and it'll take the set a bit longer to get here, crossing the pond
  10. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    Scott Wenzel just told me the Black & White set is shipping out next week. He expects the OOS Tristano set not to be available again until August/September.
  11. There might be a misunderstanding here; I wasn't talking about a 3LP-set, I was referring to the 3 mega Mosaic Commodore boxes with a total of 66 LPs, two with 23 LPs each and one with 20 LPs.
  12. Not going to happen. Once the license runs out or a set goes OOP it will never be reissued by Mosaic, not on LP and not on CD. It's in their misson statement: Why Limited Editions? Mosaic does not own Pacific Jazz, Atlantic, Columbia, RCA, Blue Note, Verve or any other catalog product. We lease all of our recordings from other record companies or individual artists and in just about every case there’s a limit on the time period we’re allowed to offer the set for sale. Therefore once the set has sold out, it will not be made available again. Mosaic By the way, there were three Mosaic Commodore LP sets, with a total of 66 LPs.
  13. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    I don't see the problem with prepayment. It's everyone's own choice, one is free not to do it. No need to moan about it.
  14. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    Same here, let them have the money straight away. In my case that also means no hassle with exchange rate fluctuations.
  15. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    Japanese Keynote box (LPs) Fresh Sound Keynote box (CDs)
  16. Mosaic's Black and White label box set

    According to the discography on the Mosaic website Jack McVie is included - click on "discography": B&W set A Comprehensive Historical Release Black & White Records Rescued from extinction – music you’ve likely never heard. Expected release date May 31 At Mosaic, presenting music that’s been hard to find — or completely overlooked — is as exciting today as it was in 1983 when we assembled our very first package of Blue Note recordings featuring Thelonious Monk. Sometimes we unveil just a handful. Other times, dozens. So, can you imagine how exhilarated we are about an 11-CD set where nearly every track has been unavailable for nearly 75 years? Unearthing the music on our new collection, Classic Black & White Jazz Sessions, has been a dream for decades. Unlike most of our sets, the original masters of these sessions are not known to exist anymore. Confusion over who owned the copyrights and who owned physical recordings we could use as source material raised additional obstacles. Again and again we were forced to push the project to the back burner. Finally, after years of research, and after generous help from a great family of record collectors around the world, the music of this incredibly neglected label, is finally available for us to release in the comprehensive, documented, and definitive fashion for which Mosaic is known. From 78s, LPs and CD compilations that were all in private collections, we’ve gathered the mind-boggling 243 titles that make up this collection spanning the years 1942-1949. Knowing the spotty re-release of just a small number of titles, we can safely say that almost all of these recordings have never been heard by more than a handful of living humans. Creating Classic Black & White Jazz Sessions was done with the same vision and labor of love that brought together in boxed set form our re-issues of the independent labels Commodore and the HRS. Those collections are long sold-out and forever out of print; they will never see the light of day again in that form. We guarantee the same for this set, so please order today to own this long-hidden treasure of 1940s jazz. The Black & White Label In a fascinating way, what makes this set so significant is that it is a microcosm of jazz in a time of transition, encompassing traditional, swing, big band and bebop. Black & White never had a grand presence and distribution of the label was slim with only two recordings becoming hits: “Call It Stormy Monday” by T-Bone Walker and “Open The Door Richard” by Jack McVea. Yet, for jazz fans, you could find genres of all styles – that is if you could find them in your local record store or even now at a thrift shop, antique store, flea market or vintage record shop. The label has been underestimated and these rarities, lovingly culled together in one package, are perfect examples of what Mosaic is all about. Based initially in Brooklyn before moving to California, Black & White documented the kind of jazz you’d be hearing on any given night in New York or LA. The label’s owners gave shots at leading sessions to those working musicians who were not typically leaders, many of whom called in “name” musicians to work alongside them. Though somewhat more obscure, these session leaders took every advantage to make music that was fresh, lively, and expressive. A Who’s Who of ‘40s Jazz Some of the artists featured will be unfamiliar to you and will be a delight for you to discover. The others? How about pianists such as Art Hodes, Cliff Jackson, Willie “The Lion” Smith, James P. Johnson, Phil Moore, Lil Armstrong, Meade Lux Lewis, Art Tatum, and Erroll Garner. Trumpeters include Jonah Jones, Buck Clayton, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerald Wilson, Red Rodney, Howard McGhee, Al Killian, and Snooky Young. Woodwind players are represented by Mezz Mezzrow, Pee Wee Russell, Sidney Bechet, Rod Cless, Art Pepper, Lucky Thompson, Barney Bigard, George Auld, Joe Thomas, Jack McVea, Marshall Royal, and Charlie Ventura. Trombone players include J.C. Higginbotham, Melba Liston, and Jimmy Knepper. On bass you’ll find Jack Lesberg, Pops Foster, Oscar Pettiford, Charles Mingus and Red Callender. Drummers include George Wettling, Baby Dodds, Lee Young, Chico Hamilton, Shadow Wilson and Denzil Best. The set includes many, many more artists such as Barney Kessel, Teddy Bunn, and Laurindo Almeida, plus vocalists Ivie Anderson, Helen Humes, Ernestine Anderson and Etta Jones. The Mosaic Records Creative Process It was a label screaming for attention and to be a part of the Mosaic catalog. Classic Black & White Jazz Sessions has been on our minds for years. But for lack of not knowing who owned the material, after much research and communication with collectors and label companies, we came to a dead end. The last possible owners, Pickwick, were out of business. It was only after DJ, researcher and collector Lloyd Rauch and jazz film historian extraordinaire Mark Cantor came to us and asked why not put out a set of the rich Black & White catalog did we decide that the time was right to re-visit and assemble a collection of this amazing and diverse record label. Mosaic’s Scott Wenzel listened and decided what were favorable candidates to the set and then it was time to cast a wide net to an all-star cast of collectors all over the world and help locate the recordings we needed from this rare label and find them in the best sound possible. But finding the original recordings were not easy to come by. Many releases weren’t of the highest quality shellac and this post-war / independent label had to take what they were given. However, with pristine copies of original 78s found, Andreas Meyer and Nancy Conforti of Swan Studios, who have garnered many Grammys and kudos from around the world on their work both in the jazz and classical fields, have brilliantly extracted more of the music you would ever find anywhere of these precious and neglected gems of jazz. Our booklet accompanying the set includes essays by Dan Morgenstern, Billy Vera and the producer, Scott Wenzel. You’ll also be treated to the most accurate discography ever of this material plus extremely rare, invaluable, and in some cases never-seen photos amassed from collectors around the world. Audio Clips To Come
  17. My Friend Hot Ptah has passed.

    Very sorry to hear this. Liked his posts here.
  18. Bentsy has already posted this in the "Latest Reissues from Hiroshi" thread, but I thought this deserves its own thread: Hiroshi Tanno is closing down his store at the end of January, 2012. I have bought many CDs from him over the years; his service has always been impeccable and I am very sorry to see him go.
  19. According to her LinkedIn account she's currently working as office administrator at the Dept. of Public Works, Darien, CT.
  20. Probably Cindy Wilson. She was Mosaic's office manager between 1994 and 2009.
  21. Catesta?

    I'm another one, though I still occasionally lurk and post here, but I keep my posts at a minimum. There are more who left because of you, but I'm not going to name names, I only speak for myself. That's all I'm going to say about it.
  22. Whither Allen Lowe?

    Wishing you all the best.
  23. Phil Schaap R.I.P.

    Sorry to hear this. Listened to some of his shows, and he did indeed talk a lot, but it was always at least interesting.
  24. I don't agree, a loud mastering can make the music unlistenable (headaches, fatigue, that kind of thing), at least for me. I'm certainly not saying that's the case here, but the so-called "loudness wars" have done a lot of harm, especially in rock music, but not only there.
  25. Funny you should say that, I just got that kind of feeling - being part of a historic run, even though it was years before I was born - when I listened to the first couple of discs of Mosaic's Savory Collection set, which I only got the other day. Wonderful set, a historic document. But I'm digressing...