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  1. ECM Press Releases for New Items

    ECM Areni Agbabian Bloom Areni Agbabian: voice, piano Nicolas Stocker: percussion Release date: April 26, 2019 ECM 2549 B0029232-02 UPC: 6025 675 2590 5 Areni Agbabian casts a quiet spell with her art, as an improvising vocalist, folk singer, storyteller and pianist. Her voice has been described as “bell-toned” by The Guardian and “lush” by theLos Angeles Times, the music she creates with it “intensely focused, moving toward some kind of hidden truth,” according to The New York Times. Agbabian’s ECM debut, Bloom, has a richness that belies its spare ingredients: just her evocative voice and piano, along with the subtly ingenious percussion of Nicolas Stocker (who was last heard on ECM with Nik Bärtsch’s Mobile ensemble). Born and raised in Los Angeles into an Armenian family, Agbabian came to international attention via performances and recordings with groups led by Armenian jazz pianist Tigran Hamasyan. Bloom draws deeply on the singer’s Armenian heritage, as she reinterprets sacred hymns, a traditional spoken-word tale and a dark folk melody transcribed by the great Armenian composer and ethnomusicologist Komitas. She intersperses these among her own vocal and instrumental compositions, which channel a wide world of influences, from Komitas to Tigran Mansurian, from Morton Feldman to George Crumb, from Patty Waters to Kate Bush. The melody that recurs through the highlights “Petal One,” “Petal Two” and “Full Bloom” glows with an aural and emotional purity that’s characteristic of Agbabian’s music. Agbabian recorded Bloom at Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI in Lugano, Switzerland, with ECM founder Manfred Eicher producing. The two had met some years before at a post-concert dinner in Paris, with Eicher then listening to her first solo album, Kissy(bag). About the experience of working with the producer for Bloom, Agbabian says: “First of all, the studio in Lugano is a warm wooden room with a natural reverb and projection, perfect for this sort of acoustic music. With his years of experience, Manfred guides an artist to the correct balance musically. As far as my songs went, he suggested a few changes that made them more appropriate for a studio recording as opposed to concert performance. He also suggested that I play slightly different takes of the same material, which created recurring motifs that gave the album narrative shape. There are a couple of pieces credited to Manfred, ‘Rain Drops’ and ‘Whiteness,’ that serve as parentheses within the storybook feel of Bloom. He had suggested that I play a mid-range chord in E-flat and slowly make my way up the keyboard with an airy feel. He conducted these moments live in the studio space.” Stocker also contributes two solo percussion pieces to the album, “Light Effects” and “Colored.” About the collaboration with the percussionist, Agbabian explains: “When I was invited to check out the studio in Lugano, I met Nicolas while he was playing a Nik Bärtsch session. I could immediately tell that Nicolas was a very kind person, and I really liked the color palette of his percussion setup, which he extended with unique bells and gongs. We ended up working together intensively for a few weeks before recording, both in L.A. and Zurich. I added a few items to his percussion set, such as Tibetan singing bowls. Also, the piano preparations on some of the pieces ended up giving us a unified percussion sound, especially on my piece ‘The Water Bride.’ And ‘The River’ was a pure improvisation by the two of us from which his polyrhythmic groove in ‘Colored’ emerged.” Agbabian has been a singer since she was an infant, already humming melodies at the age of 11 months. Growing up in a world of sound, she was hitting xylophones and drums by age 4, making up melodies and rhythms. She sang rhymes and folk songs with her aunt, a trained opera singer and Armenian music specialist, and her mother, a storyteller and Armenian folklorist. These women imprinted the Armenian language, its tones and inflections, into her mind and body. At age 7, Agbabian began a study of classical piano that lasted for 20 years. Throughout this period, she continued her vocal work, and by her early 20s, she had sung in many choirs of Armenian sacred and Bulgarian folk music, eventually performing traditional Armenian folklore and music professionally. She gradually integrated these byways of her musical journey into an individual musical path. After some years performing in the improvised music scene of New York City, Agbabian returned to her hometown of Los Angeles. She joined Hamasyan’s quintet, touring the world and recording two albums with him; she also wrote the lyrics to “Lament” on his Shadow Theater LP. As a vocalist, Agbabian has worked not only in jazz and folk music but also in contemporary opera, dance, new music and multimedia performance, with her credits including the opera What To Wear by Bang on a Can composer Michael Gordon. She released her solo album Kissy(Bag) in 2014. Of late, Agbabian has been performing Armenian and Persian music in Los Angeles with Lernazang, a group of young folk instrumentalists; she also collaborates with guitarist Gagik “Gagas” Khodavirdi, her husband. Throughout Bloom, a sense of spiritual yearning makes itself felt, strikingly so in Agbabian’s own deeply introspective songs “Patience” and “Mother,” as well as in the Armenian sacred hymn “Anganim Arachi Ko.” The connection between the traditional material and the original songs is virtually genetic. She explains: “Armenian music is in my DNA. It speaks to me on a spiritual level that I cannot explain. In fact, the sacred music eventually is what changed my life. It was through it that I came to know God, and through the imagery of the Biblical stories of the Resurrection written in grabar (classical Armenian) that my heart was transformed. Intellectually, it is probably more difficult than any other music I have studied, European classical music included, especially because of Armenian music’s linguistic and rhythmic challenges, the microtonality and the memorization. I’m in my fourth year of participating in sacred music study and practice. This requires an understanding of ritual time, and supporting the cerebral process of understanding music with conscious listening of my whole person.” ECM Stephan Micus White Night Stephan Micus: kalimbas duduk, bass duduk, sinding, dondon, fourteen-string guitar, steel string guitar, Tibetan cymbals, cane whistles, vocals Release date: April 26, 2019 ECM 2639 B0029979-02 UPC: 6025 773 6220 0 Though the purity of the moonlight has silenced both nightingale and cricket, the cuckoo alone sings all the white night. (Anonymous, Japanese) “I’ve always been inspired by moonlight,” says Stephan Micus. “Often I go walking, swimming in the sea or, best of all, cross-country skiing when the moon turns the snow into millions of diamonds. Moonlight for me has a special magic.” Stephan Micus has a strong and physical relationship with nature, landscapes and the people who inhabit them, all over the world. You hear that in his music which is created for instruments he has collected in years of travels and re-fashioned for his own use. He plays all the parts and multi-tracks them with up to 22 layers on the ‘Fireflies’ track on this album. By contrast, ‘The Moon’ and ‘All the Way’ are solo pieces recorded in one take. On White Night, his 23rd solo album for ECM, Micus takes us on a journey into an imaginary world entering at ‘The Eastern Gate’ and exiting at ‘The Western Gate’. In between the gates unfold the different scenes of the composition: ‘The Bridge’, ‘The River’, ‘The Moon’ and so on. Aside from the 14 string guitar, to conjure this world Micus plays instruments from Armenia, Tibet, India, Egypt, Ghana, Senegal, Tanzania, Botswana, Namibia and Ethiopia, most of them in combinations never heard before. For each of his albums, Micus uses a defined cast of instruments to create its distinctive sound world. On White Night, the leading characters are African ‘thumb pianos’ (kalimba) and the Armenian duduk, two instruments which are extremely different in their personalities. The duduk always has a trace of melancholy, whereas the kalimba is imbued with a spirit of joy. To combine the two is like bringing two irreconcilable spirits together. The technical name for the kalimba is a lamellophone, which comprises metal tongues attached to a resonator. They are known by different names in various parts of sub-Saharan Africa - mbira, kalimba, sanza, ndingo etc. On this album Micus uses instruments he has collected in Tanzania, Botswana, Namibia and Ethiopia. “These are old and unique instruments,” he says. “Most of them I found in remote villages and so each one has its own story connected with the people I met, with the landscapes and these memories help me create the music for them, something an instrument bought in a shop could never do. In most cases I change the tunings according to the music which evolves when I start improvising on them. My first kalimba I bought in Tanzania some 26 years ago.” “Whenever I travel I take a kalimba with me on my journey. It’s such a great instrument to carry along,” says Micus who has a practical relationship with these instruments. “It’s small and doesn’t disturb anyone. This enables me to keep working on some tunes and rhythms even if I am on the road.” One of the solo tracks at the heart of the album is ‘All the Way’, played on a kalimba Micus bought in a village where the indigenous San people have been settled in Botswana. This is a one-take performance on an instrument of 22 keys. “I admire the way that for thousands of years, the San lived on the land without leaving any traces or without doing any damage to it, just like the Australian aborigines or Native Americans. But strangely people have always looked down on these people, while really we should honour them for this great achievement”. This kalimba solo is a tribute to all people who respect our planet and preserve its amazing beauty. Another kalimba, from Tanzania, that Micus uses on ‘The River’, has small rings on its keys creating a buzzing sound like waves and splashes in the water. On ‘The Bridge’ and ‘The Forest’, Micus uses a kalimba specially created for this album. He commissioned the South African instrumentalist Phillip Nangle to build an instrument with just bronze keys instead of the usual steel ones. Bronze gives a warmer, more mellow sound, which makes a superb accompaniment to Micus’ voice singing his lyrics in an invented language. Micus has made two trips to Armenia to learn to play the duduk, the plaintive, oboe-like instrument which lends its melancholy tone to so much Armenian music. The first time he studied with Djivan Gasparyan, the second with Gevorg Dabaghyan, two musicians who are considered by many to be the greatest living masters. He’s used the duduk on two previous albums Towards the Wind (2002) and Snow (2008). Traditionally the bass duduk is only used as an accompanying drone, playing just one or two notes. But on the opening and closing tracks ofWhite Night Micus uses it for soulful melodies that frame his story with themes of deep profundity. You’ve never heard a duduk go as low as this. The other solo in the center of the album is ‘The Moon’, a duduk solo, played on a much smaller instrument than the standard one. The composition has nothing to do with traditional Armenian music, but certainly evokes the lonely, misty and ethereal shimmer of the moon in the night sky. For many of his CD booklets Micus chooses a small text to intensify the particular mood of each album. For White Night he’s chosen a Japanese poem, so the track ‘The Poet’ could represent the anonymous writer reciting his verse about the entrancing birdsong in the white, moonlit night. Other striking instruments we hear are Indian cane whistles multi-tracked many times, which in ‘Fireflies’ alternate with Micus’ own voice in chorus. “They are simple cane flutes which you play like a recorder. I bought them on the street somewhere costing a few cents each.” And there are the Tibetan cymbals which Micus bought in Ladakh. These are ritual temple instruments and their clashing rhythms bring a ceremonial quality to the opening and closing of this album. It’s a reminder that Stephan Micus’ music has a profundity, that connects to cultures all over the world and their musical expression. But as he says, “it makes no sense for me to play traditional Armenian duduk.” His desire is to take us on a journey, using rare and obscure instruments combined in a novel way, to reach out to our universal emotions. “Nowadays people in cities have lost contact with the moon,” says Micus. “I have lived all my life in the countryside and have had the privilege to experience many nights around the full moon. That’s why I dedicate this album to the moon which has always been a source of magic in many cultures. Music too is a source of magic which is where the two connect.” ECM Michele Rabbia/Gianluca Petrella/Eivind Aarset Lost River digital release date: May 31, 2019 CD release date: June 7, 2019 Michele Rabbia: drums, percussion, electronics; Gianluca Petrella: trombone, sounds; Eivind Aarset: guitar, electronics Lost River is an evocative post-ambient, richly textured sonic event, and one of the outstanding beyond-category recordings of recent ECM history. Drummer Michele Rabbia and guitarist Eivind Aarset had played many duo concerts, and Rabbia had also worked with trombonist Gianluca Petrella in other contexts, but this recording marks a premiere for the trio. Spontaneously improvised for the most part, and with mysterious detail flowering inside its soundscapes, Lost River keeps revealing new forms. Rabbia's drumming is freely creative and propulsive, and enhanced through his use of electronics. Aarset's flowing playing will delight listeners who have enjoyed his Dream Logic project and his contribution to recordings with Nils Petter Molvӕr, Tigran Hamasyan, Andy Sheppard and others. Petrella's role as a principal instrumental voice will surprise those who know him only as a great "jazz" soloist with Enrico Rava and Giovanni Guidi; his broad range is very well deployed in Manfred Eicher's widescreen production on this recording, made in Udine in January 2018. ECM Paul Bley / Gary Peacock / Paul Motian When Will The Blues Leave digital release date: May 31, 2019 CD release date: June 7, 2019 Paul Bley: piano Gary Peacock: double bass Paul Motian: drums In 1999, a year after recording the splendid reunion album Not Two, Not One, Paul Bley's highly innovative trio with Gary Peacock and Paul Motian took to the road with concerts on both sides of the Atlantic. When Will The Blues Leave documents a terrific performance at the Aula Magna di Trevano in Switzerland. Included here, alongside the angular freebop Ornette Coleman title track, are Paul Bley's "Mazatlan", brimming over with energy, Gary Peacock's evergreen "Moor", Gershwin's tender "I Loves You Porgy" and much more... All played with the subtlety of master improvisers, recasting the music in every moment.
  2. ECM Press Releases for New Items

    ECM Giovanni Guidi Avec le temps Giovanni Guidi: piano Thomas Morgan: double bass João Lobo: drums Francesco Bearzatti: tenor saxophone Roberto Cecchetto: guitar Release date: March 22, 2019 ECM 2604 B0029680-02 UPC: 6025 770 6280 3 Giovanni Guidi is one of the most consistently creative pianists in Europe today, focusing inspirations from contemporary jazz and free playing in a strongly lyrical approach of his own. As well as composing his own material, he has a discerning ear for pieces his group might adapt. The new album begins with an extraordinary interpretation of a yearning song of love and loss by the Monaco-born poet-composer-chansonnier Léo Ferré (1916-1993). The melody and atmosphere of Ferré’s “Avec Le Temps”, one of the classics of the French chanson repertoire, are explored in new detail by Guidi and bassist Thomas Morgan. Of Morgan, Guidi recently noted: “I don’t know if there are other musicians who are so inside the music with every note, who capture everything that’s happening in every moment.” The concentrated soulfulness of the bass playing may put listeners in mind of Charlie Haden’s heyday: Thomas Morgan, too, plays the music not the background. The song’s deep feeling is intensified by João Lobo’s creatively free snare and cymbals, offering fresh color and texture. Both the title piece here and the closing “Tomasz”, a Guidi original dedicated to the late Tomasz Stanko, take Giovanni’s conception of the art of the trio to the next level, extending the work begun on the critically-praised albums City of Broken Dreams and This Is The Day. Avec le temps also initiates some new departures as Guidi expands his group to quintet size with the addition of saxophonist Francesco Bearzatti and guitarist Roberto Cecchetto for six of the pieces here. The quintet originally toured under the headline Giovanni Guidi Inferno, and while it plainly has the capacity to burn down the house, it also radiates a more differentiated flame, as needs dictate. Bearzatti and Cecchetto are strikingly original and resourceful musicians, both leaders in their own right. Bearzatti is one of the outstanding saxophonists of his generation in Italy. Anchored in the tradition – he studied with, among others, George Coleman – he also pushes into areas of pure sound exploration and is conceptually open-minded; his own discography including tributes to, for instance, Malcolm X and to Woody Guthrie. Latterly, Bearzatti and Giovanni Guidi have also been playing together in duo. Like Guidi himself, guitarist Roberto Cecchetto has played extensively with Enrico Rava. Cecchetto was for eight years a core member of Rava’s Electric Five group. His own leader dates include recordings with Guidi and with Bearzatti, and he has worked with many distinguished players including Gianluigi Trovesi, Lee Konitz, Kenny Wheeler, Roswell Rudd, Stefano Bollani and more. Thomas Morgan’s sensitive work with Tomasz Stanko, David Virelles, Masabumi Kikuchi, Craig Taborn, Jakob Bro, Bill Frisell, and many more has been widely-acclaimed. In the Guidi group he is well-matched by drummer João Lobo, who similarly brings deep listening to every performance. Collectively, the quintet is ready to deal with the challenges of the most diverse material, from the bluesy cast of “15th of August”, to the group creation “No Taxi” which is reminiscent of some of Ornette Coleman’s themes, to the tender lullaby “Ti Stimo”, and the free-flowing ballad “Caino”, which draws forth beautiful playing by Guidi and Bearzatti. As a whole, Avec le temps proposes a fascinating journey over changing terrain. *** Giovanni Guidi, born in Foligno, near Perugia, in 1985, was launched on the international stage in the groups of Enrico Rava. After being struck by the focused intensity of the young pianist’s playing during the summer courses of Siena Jazz, Rava invited him into his band. Guidi, who was 17 years old when he first played with the trumpeter, appears with Rava on the ECM albums Tribe and Rava On The Dance Floor. In addition to Giovanni Guidi’s recordings with Thomas Morgan and João Lobo, the pianist can be heard on Ida Lupino, with Gianluca Petrella, Gerald Cleaver and Louis Sclavis, which was voted Italian jazz album of the year in Musica Jazz. Avec le temps was recorded at Studios La Buissonne in Pernes-les-Fontaines in the south of France in November 2017, and produced by Manfred Eicher. As with City of Broken Dreams and This Is The Day, the cover painting is by Emmanuel Barcilon, whose delicate yet intense color-fields provide an apt visual metaphor for the musical poetry of Giovanni Guidi. ECM Areni Agbabian Bloom Areni Agbabian: voice, piano Nicolas Stocker: percussion Release date: April 26, 2019 ECM 2549 B0029232-02 UPC: 6025 675 2590 5 Areni Agbabian casts a quiet spell with her art, as an improvising vocalist, folk singer, storyteller and pianist. Her voice has been described as “bell-toned” by The Guardian and “lush” by theLos Angeles Times, the music she creates with it “intensely focused, moving toward some kind of hidden truth,” according to The New York Times. Agbabian’s ECM debut, Bloom, has a richness that belies its spare ingredients: just her evocative voice and piano, along with the subtly ingenious percussion of Nicolas Stocker (who was last heard on ECM with Nik Bärtsch’s Mobile ensemble). Born and raised in Los Angeles into an Armenian family, Agbabian came to international attention via performances and recordings with groups led by Armenian jazz pianist Tigran Hamasyan. Bloom draws deeply on the singer’s Armenian heritage, as she reinterprets sacred hymns, a traditional spoken-word tale and a dark folk melody transcribed by the great Armenian composer and ethnomusicologist Komitas. She intersperses these among her own vocal and instrumental compositions, which channel a wide world of influences, from Komitas to Tigran Mansurian, from Morton Feldman to George Crumb, from Patty Waters to Kate Bush. The melody that recurs through the highlights “Petal One,” “Petal Two” and “Full Bloom” glows with an aural and emotional purity that’s characteristic of Agbabian’s music. Agbabian recorded Bloom at Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI in Lugano, Switzerland, with ECM founder Manfred Eicher producing. The two had met some years before at a post-concert dinner in Paris, with Eicher then listening to her first solo album, Kissy(bag). About the experience of working with the producer for Bloom, Agbabian says: “First of all, the studio in Lugano is a warm wooden room with a natural reverb and projection, perfect for this sort of acoustic music. With his years of experience, Manfred guides an artist to the correct balance musically. As far as my songs went, he suggested a few changes that made them more appropriate for a studio recording as opposed to concert performance. He also suggested that I play slightly different takes of the same material, which created recurring motifs that gave the album narrative shape. There are a couple of pieces credited to Manfred, ‘Rain Drops’ and ‘Whiteness,’ that serve as parentheses within the storybook feel of Bloom. He had suggested that I play a mid-range chord in E-flat and slowly make my way up the keyboard with an airy feel. He conducted these moments live in the studio space.” Stocker also contributes two solo percussion pieces to the album, “Light Effects” and “Colored.” About the collaboration with the percussionist, Agbabian explains: “When I was invited to check out the studio in Lugano, I met Nicolas while he was playing a Nik Bärtsch session. I could immediately tell that Nicolas was a very kind person, and I really liked the color palette of his percussion setup, which he extended with unique bells and gongs. We ended up working together intensively for a few weeks before recording, both in L.A. and Zurich. I added a few items to his percussion set, such as Tibetan singing bowls. Also, the piano preparations on some of the pieces ended up giving us a unified percussion sound, especially on my piece ‘The Water Bride.’ And ‘The River’ was a pure improvisation by the two of us from which his polyrhythmic groove in ‘Colored’ emerged.” Agbabian has been a singer since she was an infant, already humming melodies at the age of 11 months. Growing up in a world of sound, she was hitting xylophones and drums by age 4, making up melodies and rhythms. She sang rhymes and folk songs with her aunt, a trained opera singer and Armenian music specialist, and her mother, a storyteller and Armenian folklorist. These women imprinted the Armenian language, its tones and inflections, into her mind and body. At age 7, Agbabian began a study of classical piano that lasted for 20 years. Throughout this period, she continued her vocal work, and by her early 20s, she had sung in many choirs of Armenian sacred and Bulgarian folk music, eventually performing traditional Armenian folklore and music professionally. She gradually integrated these byways of her musical journey into an individual musical path. After some years performing in the improvised music scene of New York City, Agbabian returned to her hometown of Los Angeles. She joined Hamasyan’s quintet, touring the world and recording two albums with him; she also wrote the lyrics to “Lament” on his Shadow Theater LP. As a vocalist, Agbabian has worked not only in jazz and folk music but also in contemporary opera, dance, new music and multimedia performance, with her credits including the opera What To Wear by Bang on a Can composer Michael Gordon. She released her solo album Kissy(Bag) in 2014. Of late, Agbabian has been performing Armenian and Persian music in Los Angeles with Lernazang, a group of young folk instrumentalists; she also collaborates with guitarist Gagik “Gagas” Khodavirdi, her husband. Throughout Bloom, a sense of spiritual yearning makes itself felt, strikingly so in Agbabian’s own deeply introspective songs “Patience” and “Mother,” as well as in the Armenian sacred hymn “Anganim Arachi Ko.” The connection between the traditional material and the original songs is virtually genetic. She explains: “Armenian music is in my DNA. It speaks to me on a spiritual level that I cannot explain. In fact, the sacred music eventually is what changed my life. It was through it that I came to know God, and through the imagery of the Biblical stories of the Resurrection written in grabar (classical Armenian) that my heart was transformed. Intellectually, it is probably more difficult than any other music I have studied, European classical music included, especially because of Armenian music’s linguistic and rhythmic challenges, the microtonality and the memorization. I’m in my fourth year of participating in sacred music study and practice. This requires an understanding of ritual time, and supporting the cerebral process of understanding music with conscious listening of my whole person.”
  3. I started there in fall 1973, and was head of the Jazz Project from 1974-75. Besides Rollins, we put on Oregon, Weather Report and (a free show) Jack DeJohnette/John Abercrombie. Funny that you mention the Sam Rivers show, which was in the fall of 1973. I was there that night, and after 2 hours of high-energy music, the concert ended suddenly when the Social Hall was evacuated because of the shooting. I saw Barry Altschul recently in Houston, backing Patty Waters, and asked him if he remembered that show. He didn't. I said "it was you and Dave Holland backing Sam Rivers." He thought back and said "Are you sure it wasn't Reggie Workman?" Do you remember who it was? And yes, Straight Country and Blues. They put on a lot of great folk festivals. But so did Cornell. It was a great time for music.
  4. I just wanted to post a note about a new release of mine, in a quartet featuring the vocalist/co-leader Elaine Mitchener, bassist Neil Charles, and drummer Stephen Davis... It's called UpRoot, and is my first release on Intakt - so as you can imagine, it's beautifully produced, and includes liner notes from Brian Morton. It's mostly a programme of original compositions, although we do visit things by Patty Waters, Archie Shepp, and set a poem by Jeanne Lee. Other texts include verses from Lyn Hejinian and Rumi... Elaine's a totally wonderful vocalist, with a pretty dizzying array of influences (there have been incredible performances of Cage, Eastman, and Rzewski amongst others in just the last year; she works with movement; has background in gospel and jazz too), and Steve, Neil and I have all recorded together numerous times before...Anyway, please do consider checking it out. Here's the relevant page on the Intakt website.. For those in the UK, we are launching the album with a performance at Kings Place on 12th January. Various other dates (UK and mainland Europe) are also confirmed, and to be announced very soon!
  5. Just got back. Very, very good performance. The trio (Greene, Pavone, Altschul) were very strong. Vigorous, frequently dissonant, played with assurance and a deep empathy between them. They played some originals to start the concert, and also played some trio pieces in-between backing Waters. I really liked their take on Monk's Off Minor; certainly true to Monk but Greene, in particular, brought his own thing to it. I was very impressed with Burton Greene's playing. Patty Waters... It was interesting to hear her. Truly a case of time catching up to her: where what she did in the Sixties sounded strange and odd, now sounds more familiar because others have followed her path. She doesn't have the voice anymore to yelp and scream; it's now a small voice, breathy, quavering, a very personal sound. The trio toned down their playing while backing her, but still frequently overpowered her voice. It was obvious they loved and respected her, and loved playing behind her. Another interesting facet for me was her song selection. Here there was truly a time warp, as if we were transported back to the mid Sixties. She drew heavily from the Billie Holiday songbook, but exclusively songs where the singer is lonely, pining for her man, lost without him. Even songs that were not Holiday's seem to fit this mold, such as Ornette's "Lonely Woman." I can't imagine any female singer today presenting such a portrait of a woman who is nothing without the love of her man.
  6. April 7, 2018: Indradeep Ghosh (violin), Indrajit Bannerjee (Sitar), Subratta Bhattacharya (tabla), Allen Public Library April 9, 2018: Patty Waters with Burton Greene and Barry Altschul, Meca, Houston April 12, 2018: Brad Mehldau, Paramount Theater, Austin April 13, 2018: Brad Mehldau, Cullen Theater, Houston Antonio Sanchez, Charline McCombs Empire Theater, San Antonio April 14, 2018: Brad Mehldau, University of Texas at Dallas April 14-15, 2018: Kenny Neal, Chris Thomas King, Lazy Lester, Jimmy Duck Holmes, Baton Rouge Blues Festival April 20, 2018: Rachella Parks-Washington, Main Street Arts Festival, Fort Worth April 22, 2018: Rahul Sharma (santoor) and Aditya Kalyanpur (tabla), Austin April 26, 2018: Sona Jobarteh, Sidi Toure, Festival Internationale de Louisiane, Lafayette Joe Louis Walker, Antone's, Austin April 27, 2018: Ron Carter Trio, Christian Scott, Sidi Toure, Calvin Johnson, Bobby Rush, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Joe Louis Walker, Big Beat Dallas, Irving Randy Brecker, Rachella Parks-Washington, Denton Arts and Jazz Festival Sona Jobarteh, Festival Internationale de Louisiane, Lafayette April 28, 2018: Charles Lloyd and the Marvels, Delfeayo Marsalis Presents the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, Butler Bernstein and the Hot 9, Trumpet Mafia, Sona Jobarteh and Band (Gambia), Aurora Nealand, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Conrad Herwig, Starr Theater, Fayetteville, Arkansas Rahul Sharma (santoor) and Aditya Kalyanpur (tabla), Houston Otis Taylor, Big Beat Dallas, Irving Sidi Toure, Jupiter and Okwess, Festival Internationale de Louisiane, Lafayette April 29, 2018: Kidd Jordan and the Improvisational Arts Quintet, Henry Butler Tribute to Jelly Roll Morton, Nicholas Payton, Kenny Neal with Henry Gray and Lazy Lester, Panorama Jazz Band, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Jupiter and Okwess, Festival Internationale de Louisiane, Lafayette May 3, 2018: Archie Shepp Quartet, Jamil Sharif, Terrace Martin, Toronzo Cannon, Jeremy Davenport, Wendell Brunious, Tatiana Eva-Marie, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 4, 2018: Marcus Miller, Wessel Anderson, Jupiter and Okwess International (Congo), Little Freddie King, Lil Buck Sinegal, New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Brian Seeger's Organic Trio, New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Tatiana Eva-Marie, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 5, 2018: Sean Jones, Lurrie Bell, Jupiter and Okwess International, Louis Ford and His New Orleans Flairs, Astral Project, Blodie's Jazz Jam, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 6, 2018: Terence Blanchard featuring the E Collective, Leroy Jones, Buddy Guy, Mr. Sipp, Joe Dyson, Ellis Marsalis, Walter Wolfman Washington, Lakou Mizak (Haiti), Joe Lastie's New Orleans Sound, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Ganesh and Kumaresh (violins), Bates Recital Hall, Austin May 13, 2018: Vid. Sashank, Unity Church of Dallas Buddy Guy, Verizon Theater, Grand Prairie May 16, 2018: Buddy Guy, Wagner Noel Performing Arts Center, Midland May 17, 2018: Buddy Guy, Moody Theater, Austin May 18, 2018: Buddy Guy, Majestic Theater, San Antonio May 19: 2018: Debashish Bhattacharya (slide guitar), Nilan Chaudhuri (tabla), Allen Public Library June 20, 2018: Broken Shadows (Tim Berne, Dave King, Chris Speed, Reid Anderson), The North Door, Austin July 6, 2018: Eddie Turner, Tall City Blues Festival, Midland July 7, 2018: Kenny Neal, Vanessa Collier, Tall City Blues Festival, Midland July 16, 2018: Ronu Majhumdar (flute), Tony Bose (sarod), Jones Hall, Houston September 19, 2018: Fred Hersh, Trinity University, San Antonio September 22, 2018: Divine Trio, Allen Public Library September 28, 2018: Stanley Clarke, One World Theater, Austin October 6, 2018: Sweekar Etawah, Imdad Khani Harana (sitars), Houston April 11, 2019: Stanley Jordan, One World Theater, Austin
  7. This just in...whoa.... N A M E L E S S S O U N D P R E S E N T S JAZZ SINGER PATTY WATERS PATTY WATERS w/ BARRY ALTSCHUL - drums BURTON GREENE - piano MARIO PAVONE - bass MONDAY April 9, 8PM MECA 1900 Kane St. GENERAL SEATING. PAY WHAT YOU CAN / PAY WHAT YOU WILL. Call or email us if your preferred amount is not listed: 713-928-5653, administration@namelesssound.org EVERYONE UNDER 18 GETS IN FOR FREE.
  8. March 14, 2018: Leni Stern, Russian House, SXSW Mokoomba, Russian House, SXSW March 15, 2018: Mokoomba, Flaminco Cantina, SXSW March 16,2018: Chris Thomas King, Lava Cantina, The Colony March 17, 2018: Lil Buck Senegal, Antone's, SXSW Cedric Burnside Project, Seven Grand, SXSW March 22, 2018: Bria Skonberg, Tobin Center, San Antonio March 23, 2018: Victor Wooten Trio, Paramount Theater, Austin Bria Skonberg, Jesse H. Jones Hall, Houston March 24, 2018: Mingus Big Band, Cullen Theater, Houston Victor Wooten Trio, Granada Theater, Dallas March 25, 2018: Zakir Hussain and Rakesh Chaurasia, AISD Performing Arts Center, Austin Victor Wooten Trio, The Ballroom at Warehouse Live, Houston April 1, 2018: Nikki Hill, Big Beat Dallas, Irving April 5, 2018: Melissa Aldana, South on Main, Little Rock, Arkansas April 9, 2018: Patty Waters with Burton Greene and Barry Altschul, Meca, Houston April 12, 2018: Brad Mehldau, Paramount Theater, Austin April 13, 2018: Brad Mehldau, Cullen Theater, Houston Antonio Sanchez, Charline McCombs Empire Theater, San Antonio April 14, 2018: Brad Mehldau, University of Texas at Dallas April 14-15, 2018: Kenny Neal, Chris Thomas King, Lazy Lester, Jimmy Duck Holmes, Baton Rouge Blues Festival April 20, 2018: Rachella Parks-Washington, Main Street Arts Festival, Fort Worth April 22, 2018: Rahul Sharma (santoor) and Aditya Kalyanpur (tabla), Topfer Theater, Austin April 25-29, 2018: Sona Jobarteh, Sidi Toure, Jupiter & Okwess International, Festival Internationale de Louisiane, Lafayette April 26, 2018: Joe Louis Walker, Antone's, Austin April 27, 2018: Ron Carter Trio, Christian Scott, Sidi Toure, Calvin Johnson, Bobby Rush, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Joe Louis Walker, Big Beat Dallas, Irving Randy Brecker, Rachella Parks-Washington, Denton Arts and Jazz Festival April 28, 2018: Charles Lloyd and the Marvels, Delfeayo Marsalis Presents the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, Butler Bernstein and the Hot 9, Trumpet Mafia, Sona Jobarteh and Band (Gambia), Aurora Nealand, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Conrad Herwig, Starr Theater, Fayetteville, Arkansas Rahul Sharma (santoor) and Aditya Kalyanpur (tabla), Chainmaya Mission Auditorium, Houston Otis Taylor, Big Beat Dallas, Irving April 29, 2018: Kidd Jordan and the Improvisational Arts Quintet, Henry Butler Tribute to Jelly Roll Morton, Nicholas Payton, Kenny Neal with Henry Gray and Lazy Lester, Panorama Jazz Band, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 3, 2018: Archie Shepp Quartet, Jamil Sharif, Terrace Martin, Toronzo Cannon, Jeremy Davenport, Wendell Brunious, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 4, 2018: Marcus Miller, Wessel Anderson, Jupiter and Okwess International (Congo), Little Freddie King, Lil Buck Sinegal, New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Brian Seeger's Organic Trio, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 5, 2018: Sean Jones, Lurrie Bell, Jupiter and Okwess International, Louis Ford and His New Orleans Flairs, Astral Project, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival May 6, 2018: Terence Blanchard featuring the E Collective, Leroy Jones, Buddy Guy, Mr. Sipp, Joe Dyson, Ellis Marsalis, Walter Wolfman Washington, Lakou Mizak (Haiti), New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Ganesh and Kumaresh (violins), Bates Recital Hall, Austin May 13, 2018: Vid. Sashank, Unity Church of Dallas Buddy Guy, Verizon Theater, Grand Prairie May 16, 2018: Buddy Guy, Wagner Noel Performing Arts Center, Midland May 17, 2018: Buddy Guy, Moody Theater, Austin May 18, 2018: Buddy Guy, Majestic Theater, San Antonio June 20, 2018: Broken Shadows (Tim Berne, Dave King, Chris Speed, Reid Anderson), The North Door, Austin July 6, 2018: Eddie Turner, Tall City Blues Festival, Midland July 7, 2018: Kenny Neal, Tall City Blues Festival, Midland July 14, 2018: Ronu Majhumdar (flute), Tony Bose (sarod), Jones Hall, Houston September 22, 2018: Divine Trio, Allen Public Library September 28, 2018: Stanley Clarke, One World Theater, Austin October 6, 2018: Sweekar Etawah, Imdad Khani Harana (sitars), Houston George Brooks' ASPADA, Bates Recital Hall, Austin
  9. Name Three People...

    Meat Loaf Patty Waters Danny Burger
  10. Name Three People...

    Patty Waters Sam Rivers Delia Smith
  11. Buzzin' Fly by Tim Buckley

    Always seemed more Patty Waters than Uncle Meat to me. But yeah, if you're looking for that sensitive folky thing, it ain't here!
  12. cds: Jimmie Lunceford 1935-1937 Classics $6 Eric Dolphy In Europe V. 3 OJC $6 Patty Waters Patty Waters ESP $ 6 Barry Harris Trio Complete Live in Tokyo 1976 Jazz Lips $6 Mary Lou Williams London Sessions Vogue $6 Charade Soundtrack (Universal 100th Anniversary) comp and cond. Mancini Intrada $12 add $4 shipping 1st class CONUS my paypal is alowe5@maine.rr.com
  13. My god, does singing get any more honest than this? A collection of material from Waters' own personal collection, this set includes a 1964 Jax Beer jingle (w/Joe Newman!), a 1963 demo session for Columbia (produced by Tom Wilson, whose between-take chatter is priceless, a 1960 cut recirded in San Diego (when Waters was still singing, quite well, too, in a "traditional" "torch song" style, and, the real news, pieces recorded in 1970, 1971, 1972, and 1979, years which Waters was allegedly "lost" a la Henry Grimes. The material is a collection of standards and originals. The latter are very, VERY personal in their lyrics. Some might even call them obsessive. They focus on lonlieness and love for somebody who's not there any more (possibly Clifford Jarvis?), and they are at once compelling and disturbing, although Waters' delivery is very, VERY low-key. There's also a long solo piano piece that is simply beautiful. Nothing at all "difficult" about it, but the timing and the sensitivity of the playing makes it difficult not to get pulled in/wrapped up in it. Highlight of the disc for me is a version of "For All We Know" from 1979 - just a vocal-piano duet (all the vocal numbers save for the Jax thing, are piano (either Waters herself or somebody else) and vocal only). This song has a pretty intense lyric anyway, but Waters sings it with a mixture of resignation, sadness, loss, and quiet (VERY quiet) desperation that is the definitive reading of it, at least that I've heard. There's none of the groundbreaking extended vocal techniques of the ESP albums, btw. This is just a collection of songs by a woman who sounds like she's been there and back, and if she hasn't yet begin to find all the piecesto put back together yet, she definitely knows what it'll be like when she does. IF she does (and reports are that she has, thank God). Certainly not for everybody in these less-than-vocalist-friendly parts, but those inclined to get into singers and songs that are totally devoid of artifice and cut straight to the bone of what's going on inside are advised to check it out. It's frighteningly intimate and vulnerable, at times maybe even "unhealthily" so, but I can handle that. BTW - There's a nude photo from 1970 inside the booklet. But it's not nearly as naked as the singing.
  14. Ornette Coleman - RIP

    Interesting - I recall reading that the film had something to do with the Living Theatre, but wasn't sure if it actually was completed and released. On the OC with lyrics front, I've heard the Merrill version (beautiful) and Patty Waters also did "Lonely Woman," albeit with lyrics she wrote herself (also beautiful). The latter is on Marzette Watts' Savoy LP. Also have very few problems with Yoko Ono. She's an interesting artist and seems like a cool lady, from someone I know who works with her.
  15. Patty Waters Beer Jingle

    A buddy sent me this link to a 1964 Jax Beer jingle featuring Patty Waters of ESP fame. Check it out! http://stasick.org/pattywaters.mp3 I actually think that I remember hearing this on the air regularly in 1964. We were living in Shreveport, La then, and the airwaves were pretty full of Jax beer commercials. The first play of this file "sounded familiar", I can tell you that! PATTY WATERS!!!!!
  16. Self-Accompanying Jazz Artists

    Bobby Few. Bobby Kapp. Patty Waters.
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  18. Name Three People...

    Patty Waters Ethel Waters Martin Milner
  19. Name Three People...

    Ethel Waters Patty Waters Willard Waterman
  20. Name Three People...

    Ethel "Sweet Mama Stringbean" Waters Patty Waters Burton Greene
  21. YOUR Top three all-time jazz vocalists

    First time I went to the Monterey Jazz Festival I saw Patty Waters (as well as another favorite of mine, Bobbe Norris). Patty's sound was so brutally honest and vulnerable, I was on the edge of my seat. I had known the ESP recordings, but this was more profound. I also noticed how much she got from Ethel Waters, and when I spoke with her she confirmed this. A few years later I got to see her reunited with Burton Greene at the Vision Festival. I saw a Hendricks & Ross reunion at the Blue Note in 1999. The pianist, David (whose last name I can't remember), had been a classmate of mine in an abnormal psych class at Brooklyn College ca. 1974, but that was the only time I saw him gigging, and haven't heard of him since.
  22. YOUR Top three all-time jazz vocalists

    Pretty close to mine, though I would want to put Patty Waters and Annie Ross in there too somehow.
  23. Name Three People...

    Harvey Milk Mister T Patty Waters
  24. He had others, as well, from what I'm told (by Bernard, but on this I trust him). Yoko was very into Patty Waters, of course.