ghost of miles

COVID-19

126 posts in this topic

Just done my grocery shop - it seemed a bit subdued but on the whole fairly normal. Managed to get everything I needed - even a couple of packs of toilet paper left on the shelf !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just did a grocery run myself. Pretty busy for a Friday at 1pm. Some things were pretty wiped out: rice, beans, pasta. Didn’t even notice if there was toilet paper (we’ve got plenty).

I’d say it was as busy as a Sunday mid-afternoon (which isn’t quite as bad as Sunday nights, which are the worst):

Headed back out on a Target run in a few more min (no car, so every set of errands I can only carry so much). If I can get ~4 packages of frozen fish fillets, plus what all I just got, we’ve got plenty of food for 5-6 days, maybe 7.

I *know* we’re not sheltering in place, but there’s no telling if there’ll be such a run on stuff, that by Monday or Tuesday a lot of the shelves may be bare a couple days.

I’ll admit to stocking up of a bunch of toilet paper a couple weeks ago (when I first heard of Australia literally running out in 48 hours).

There was PLENTY here at that time, and I figured better now (then), than having to worry about running out when everyone else had stripped the shelves bare (which probably is the case now, or close to it).

We’re not worried about things very much. We’re both healthy, relatively young (51 & 52), and we don’t have any kids (and all our folks live 1,000 miles away).

We’re pretty much hermits half the time anyway, so it shouldn’t be any big deal to us (as compared to plenty of other folks).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, bresna said:

WTF is wrong with people? This is not "Bird Cage". You're not going to walk out your door and die. This isn't the plague. You don't have to shelter in place.

People are scared, and trying to come to grips with the unknown.  It is about statistics and probabilities, and the less trips out, the less contact with people/surfaces/etc., the less likely one is to catch/spread this thing.  It's not the plague, but it's also not just the flu.  I have sympathy for people right now, and will bear with them.  It will settle into a new normal soon enough.  And it will pass in time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, felser said:

People are scared, and trying to come to grips with the unknown.  It is about statistics and probabilities, and the less trips out, the less contact with people/surfaces/etc., the less likely one is to catch/spread this thing.  It's not the plague, but it's also not just the flu.  I have sympathy for people right now, and will bear with them.  It will settle into a new normal soon enough.  And it will pass in time.

I agree with felser. The big unknown is what the ultimate impact will be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As bad as the health impact could be, the economic impact could be even more destructive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest problem over here it’s the health system  This virus causes a pneumonia that requires ventilator and intensive care, don’t get fooled about the death toll: a fair number of people under 60 y/o need it to recover. Second biggest problem is the medical staff: more exposed to virus. So this virus if underestimated can cause the collapse of health system. Nobody wants medics having to decide daily who treat who don’t because there’s a lack of resources, and I would add all other diseases that require IC not only Covid. The task force of the government is formed with the best experts we have. Though I have been very critic about this government, in this case I think they are doing well.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife works in healthcare and deals with many international patients.  With a toddler at home, I am obviously concerned about my wife bringing her work home with her.  My wife and I each survived the flu within the past 6 months without infecting the other 2 people in the house, so I am hoping that we can keep the baby virus-free at the very least.

It was like the zombie apocalypse at the local stores yesterday.  We stocked up on food that would keep us during a quarantine, but we are hoping to shop like normal tomorrow.  I may have to start a thread here offering CDs for toilet paper, though.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work in a downtown city library, I figure I'm exposed to worse than this every day.  No telling though how bad it's going to be in the end.  Semi stocked up and my wife is going out for more.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live near two groceries stores.  Neither had toilet paper.  Both were pretty much stripped of rice, beans and canned vegetables.  One still had a moderate amount of fresh fruit/vegetables, while the other was stripped bare.

Toronto is going into very close to full lock-down -- all public libraries, rec centres, pools and virtually all museums are closed.  Schools were just heading into spring break (at the last minute Canadians were told not to travel, so we'll see who can and cannot cancel) and they will be closed for another two weeks after that.  People are hoping the siege will be lifted in mid-April, though I am expecting mid-May.  I will admit that I am glad we finally have the warmer weather, so if I am out and about (though that will be much rarer, since my employer is calling for essentially mandatory telecommuting and virtually everything else will be closed) I can ride my bike rather than take the bus/train.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I went out tonight to the local Shoprite to see if it was bad. It was. All the produce had been purchased. I was hoping to buy a couple of honeydews but had to settle for a couple of cantaloupes. People had their carts loaded to the gills. I purchased two big bags of rice last weekend from the Chinese food store, just because we were low, so we certainly have enough rice for awhile, come what may.  I always complain to my wife that she buys too much of this or that. I ain’t complaining no more. 

Edited by Brad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has been a lot to take in and has been a most horrible experience to see our fate realized, to see this happening.   I am not against the possibility that this was lab-manufactured.  SCIENCE IS THE MOST RESTRICTED, TABOO SUBJECT ON EARTH. """lets blame it on the little fuckin armadillo thing, no one will be none the wiser"""" This exact play has been done before in recent times, some of you might remember.  You know I was going to copy and paste like 11 pages of info for you guys but than I was all no no this is going to be too much and some of this stuff is going to drive people up a wall, so i'm doing a small post instead.  I NEVER thought I'd see this happen in my life time.  The concept of something like this happening is not foreign to me, I attended my regional 2006 Bird Flu Conference, and accounts from the future have included population differences, but here we are in 2020 with moving global pandemic. We really did it this time- congratulations homo sapien-sapien: we've come a long way baby.  Will ET step in and help us if this gets further out of control- maybe, maybe not, we just don't know.  But one thing I do know is I don't want to see this get any worse.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, bresna said:

My wife just called to tell me that several local grocery stores have bare shelves. WTF is wrong with people? This is not "Bird Cage". You're not going to walk out your door and die. This isn't the plague. You don't have to shelter in place.

No, it isn't the plague, but it is very important to limit exposure to large groups of people so that community spread can be reduced or cut off. It would be wise to treat this almost as if you have to shelter in place, until at least clinical testing can catch up. The health care system is depending on people doing this before their capacity for ICU is maxed out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This hoarding thing is beyond stupid. It's not like a hurricane where stores can't open or you can't find gasoline to fill your tank. I was thinking about a small Sam's run this weekend and was looking at the freezer and figuring we were OK until next weekend, will just need to get more then. Since supply chains aren't severed I am sure people can find what they need ... eventually?

And I just found out from my wife that when she ran out last night it was for horse feed, and naturally there were hardly any bags left at the one retailer that was open after 8 pm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been told that, at age 64, I am considered "elderly". Who knew?

I've also been told that at one local hospital network, if it gets to be crunch time in ICUs with limited resources, that "young" people will be prioritized over "older" people for resources like ventilators. Kinda the ultimate "Ok, Boomer"! Nature - and administrative decisions - will show us yet that we are not meant to live at the center of ours and everybody else's universe forever!

So, it's time to just stay at home as much as reasonably possible, avoid crowds as much as possible, just keep a safe distance in all ways in all things, and keep an eye on Craigslist for ventilators.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time to bunker down with the Mosaics..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, one more thing - I'm seeing that local "arts" concerts that are being cancelled are offering credits for future gigs, or an opportunity to donate the tickets back to the organization for a tax-deductible contribution, all sorts of options except getting a straight-up refund.

Cash flow's a bitch, ain't it.

The Dos and Don’ts of ‘Social Distancing’

https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2020/03/coronavirus-what-does-social-distancing-mean/607927/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, JSngry said:

I've been told that, at age 64, I am considered "elderly". Who knew?

I've also been told that at one local hospital network, if it gets to be crunch time in ICUs with limited resources, that "young" people will be prioritized over "older" people for resources like ventilators.

Don't worry Jim, if triageing comes, you've got better chances at 64 then my Mom at 85. It's the generation before you that's going to be left out to die. Mostly. :g

(I just read that 60 is the spot where death rates really increase, though I also heard that 50 is the start of increasing death rates.)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JSngry said:

Oh, one more thing - I'm seeing that local "arts" concerts that are being cancelled are offering credits for future gigs, or an opportunity to donate the tickets back to the organization for a tax-deductible contribution, all sorts of options except getting a straight-up refund.

Cash flow's a bitch, ain't it.

The Dos and Don’ts of ‘Social Distancing’

https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2020/03/coronavirus-what-does-social-distancing-mean/607927/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

The only thing I was doing in that article (besides going to the grocery store) was going to the gym, which I’ve decided to curtail. We have a lot of walking paths around here so that’s what I will be doing.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

IMG_8083.jpeg

Edited by jlhoots

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was in a store last night and the guy stocking the shelves was saying, "I don't know what is wrong with these people. There are no shortages. These shelves will be re-stocked in a day or two".

Hoarding makes life difficult for all of us. Most people shop week to week. If they go out now, they're screwed because of the hoarders. Luckily (?) I got sent home Thursday, so I decided to go shopping for my wife. I was even able to buy some toilet paper (we were almost out). A day later this craziness started and Trump's declaration of a national state of emergency put an exclamation point on it. My wife is getting Facebook and text message updates about which stores have what. Insanity. Next up - people will start getting robbed of groceries in the store parking lots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I ran by a downtown grocery store and they had just received a shipment of tp.  They were rationing it to 2 large packages per household.  While a lot of people had one in their carts, it wasn't universal.  The panic, at least downtown, seems to have subsided.  Still no tp in my neighbourhood stores.

Where I think there will be a lot of grumbling and second-guessing is when the 2-3 week lock down goes into a full month and beyond.  Especially because schools are closed and there is virtually nothing for children (who supposedly are less susceptible) to do.  They can't go to spring break camp, rec centres, libraries, pools, museums, etc.  And this is also the time we'll start seeing the first wave of bankruptcies.  

Edited by ejp626

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.