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I'm big on e.e. cummings. I enjoy reading poetry, but I'm too impatient. A good poem for me requires tons of time to dig into, and I keep wanting to turn the page.

There's a big difference for me in reading a poem silently or out loud. My absolute favorite to read out loud is the portion of The Wasteland with the woman speaking...for some reason I really get off on reading that out loud with my best "Monty Python old woman" voice. :g Try it; it's great!!

It's strange, but I love reading cummings, but not out loud. I love reading Langston Hughes out loud, but not silently.

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Any readers of poems here? If so, what authors do you like?

Basho Matsuo, Shiki Masaoka, Issa Kobayashi (haikuists) are just a few of my favs.

but lately i've been involved with an internet group that occasionally writs 'Renku' which is linked Haiku that many people write together.

as for traditional poetry, i dig Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Charles Bukowski, Patti Smith et.al.

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Any readers of poems here? If so, what authors do you like?

Dean Young (who used to live here in Bloomington), Paul Celan, Ingeborg Bachmann, Rilke, Hart, Crane, & some of the radical proletarian poets of the 30's whom Alan Wald has been championing in recent years. I also like Kevin Young, a poet who now teaches here at IU. I go through phases w/poetry; haven't had one in awhile and feel another coming on.

The Library of America has begun an American Poets series and will be publishing three more volumes next spring.

Currently reading Alan Furst's DARK STAR.

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Jacman:

Have you ever read "The Worst Journey in the World" by Apsley Cherry-Garrard? I love adventure/survival books, too, and this was one of the best. This guy went to Antarctica w/Scott (but wasn't on the Pole team) and was part of a group that went to collect penguin eggs ... in the dead of the Antarctic winter. This is the journey of the title. Amazing stuff.

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Any readers of poems here? If so, what authors do you like?

Charles Reznikoff and Gilbert Sorrentino are two favorites.

Jonathan Williams and Charles Bukowski are two of my favorite poets who write in a humorous mode (tho not everything they've written is "funny".) (I don't know for sure, but I have a feeling that Mr. Williams would not appreciate being listed with Mr. Bukowski, and if Bukowski were alive, probably vice versa, but I'm doing the listing and they're not, so they stand together here.)

Thanks for the push and reminder, Late. I'm taking a book of poetry off the shelves this afternoon, and will read some poems. I don't do this often enough - I would say "rarely" would cover it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sure, Bachmann...

I read Malina recently, and really loved it! You got to have enough time to read it in two or three days. A great novel!

You know "Der gute Gott von Manhattan"? Love it!

Of her short stories (hell, these are no short stories, these are "Erzählungen"...), I know only a few, but have them all at hand, in case I want to read more...

ubu

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Are there good translations of Bachmann? I think here language is quite one of a kind. Also she's got an austrian touch. I guess quite some is lost with translation, no?

ubu

King,

I'm not sure--I have the late-1980's translations of THIRTIETH and THREE PATHS, plus the paperback of her poetry that came out in the mid-1990s. Are there additional English translations? My German is only so-so, so I tend to read her in English...

Here are some links to websites about her:

Ingeborg

Bachmann

inGerman

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Not as heavy duty as some of the above books but I enjoyed reading Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington, by John Edward Hasse. It didn't have any great insights but presented a straight forward outline of Ellington's life. It is a good read for the purpose of getting an overall feel for Ellington's life, and now that I've read it, I can go on to some more detailed books on various aspects of Ellington's life and music.

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I only have time for one post tonight!! Ack. I FINALLY scraped some scratch together and bought a new book to read. YAY! I marched right into Borders and picked up Hagakure.

I also have had copies of Moby Dick, Bleak House, and The Pickwick Papers that I started but never finished. I'm hoping to pick those up again soon.

Yay, I'm going to actually read stuff. Read good. Me like. Read make fun time go happy place.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Robert Sklar, MOVIE-MADE AMERICA, a book I bought a couple of years ago, knowing (as with many of the books I pick up) that one day it would announce, "Hey, read me!" from the stack of volumes wherein it resides. Just finished Spain Rodriguez's graphic-novel adaption of William Gresham's NIGHTMARE ALLEY (a very haunting late-40's noir story about the rise and fall of a spiritualist con man). Also reading THE MUSICAL WORLD OF J.J. JOHNSON--I'm hoping to do a special about him for what would have been his 80th birthday this January.

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