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RIP Leonard Nimoy

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RIP.

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Leonard Nimoy Dies at 83

I Am Not Spock proclaimed the title of Leonard Nimoy's 1975 autobiography, in which the veteran actor tried to distinguish himself from his most iconic role, as Star Trek's emotionless half-human, half-Vulcan science officer. Twenty years later, he published a follow-up entitled, I Am Spock, in which the actor-director warmly embraced his pointy-eared alter ego. Like it or not, Nimoy — who passed away on Feb. 27 at the age of 83 from end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — was Spock to generations of sci-fi fans, so much so that when J.J. Abrams rebooted the franchise in the 2009 blockbuster, Nimoy was the one original cast member he made sure to bring back.

Even though the role defined his career for those of us watching him at home and in theaters, Spock was only one small part of Nimoy's overall life. An actor from childhood, the Boston-born Nimoy worked steadily on television before and after Star Trek, appearing on such disparate shows as Sea Hunt, Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible and In Search Of…, a five-season series that explored the mysteries of the paranormal. In the '80s, he became an established film director, overseeing back-to-back big-screen Star Trek installments (The Search for Spock and The Voyage Home) followed by the 1987 hit, 3 Men and a Baby.

Nimoy parlayed his eye for the camera into a respected career as a photographer, snapping pictures that hung in galleries and were collected in books like The Full Body Project — a collection for which he shot nude photos of plus-sized and obese women. "The first time I had photographed a person of that size and shape, it was scary," he remarked in a 2007 NPR interview. "I didn't know quite how to treat this figure. And I think that's a reflection of something that's prevalent in our culture. I think, in general, we are sort of conditioned to see a different body type as acceptable and maybe look away when the other body type arrives. It led me to a new consciousness about the fact that so many people live in body types that are not the type that's being sold by fashion models."

That's the kind of eminently logical argument that Spock would make and speaks to how being involved in a progressive, socially-conscious series like Star Trek must have helped shape Nimoy's worldview going forward. One of the reasons the franchise has endured is that it imagines a future Earth free of prejudice and strife. Through his life and work on-screen and off, Nimoy sought to make that world of tomorrow possible today


https://tv.yahoo.com/blogs/tv-news/leonard-nimoy-dies-at-83-171803235.html

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So sad to hear this. RIP.

Spock was definitely my favorite character on classic Star Trek (to say nothing of the movies).

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I recall him on Mission Impossible. I believe that was after Star Trek.

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He'll always be remembered as Spock, but here is a photo from Mission Impossible.

Mission-Impossible-Terror-Paris-master-o

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Live Long and Prosper.

Part of out youth is gone.

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Very sorry to learn this. I knew he went into the hospital with a lung infection, but didn't expect this. Rest in Peace.

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Yeah, most of his work a Paris on MI is realy fine. Just finished Season 1 of ST last night, and a noted elsewhere, Spock is my newest hero.

And - as great as Barbara Bain's eyebrow-acting was on MI, Nimoy's on ST has it beat, I do believe.

RIP

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The ills of smoking.

But perhaps his most meaningful recent tweet, from January, appears to be a reference to the smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that would take his life:

Don't smoke. I did. Wish I never had. LLAP

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Very sad.

Nimoy was an important part of my childhood who somehow managed to stay with me into adulthood, whereas others dropped off.

Since this is a music-related forum, may I also add at this time that the Star Trek music that I heard as a kid played a very pivotal role in piquing my interest in film scores, jazz, and classical music.

LLAP.

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We all wanted to be Spock, but we acted like Kirk instead.

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RIP. I think the fact we all believed him in his role, made him a great actor.

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Live Long and Prosper.

Part of out youth is gone.

Yes

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RIP. Yesterday I had a fun time listening to his recording of "Both Sides Now", which is not very good*** yet seemed appropriate on such a day.

***But still better than Judy Collins's!

Edited by Guy

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Here is a Nimoy tidbit that may be of interest to some of you. (I did not see this mentioned in the obits.)

The part of Boston where Nimoy grew up was called the West End. It was an ethically diverse neighborhood filled with what would now be prime real estate right in the center of the city. The neighborhood was leveled circa 1960 in the name of "urban renewal." The densely-packed housing was replaced with a couple of high rise towers and some sprawling municipal monstrosities in the brutalist architectural style. The residents couldn't afford to move back into the high-rises, and even if they could, there weren't enough units to accommodate the number of residents. Decades later, the neighborhood's destruction remains a sore spot for many Bostonians, and to this day, it is universally acknowledged as a textbook example of how not to do urban renewal.

One day in the 1940s, someone in the West End snapped a picture of some boys who were outside playing in a field. The boy on the top right is Leonard Nimoy:

http://thewestendmuseum.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/leonard_nimoy.jpg

Like many West Enders, Nimoy kept the neighborhood with him. He named his boat the West End, and was a generous contributor to the West End historical society.

Here is a clip where he discusses the West End:

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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RIP Mr. Spock. There goes another slice of my youth. I was major trekkie, going as far as skipping school to see the premier of the first Trek movie.

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RIP Mr. Spock. There goes another slice of my youth. I was major trekkie, going as far as skipping school to see the premier of the first Trek movie.

Same here. 1979 I was online with my brother for the premier of the movie in Manhattan. I believe it was in December.

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He took a role some would have run from, enhanced it, and gave it grace. A sad loss.

gregmo

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I always loved Spock, and Kirk ..... well he "got the girl more often", as he himself admitted - but without Spock and the others, he never would have made it. Live long and prosper in volcanian heaven.

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Here is a Nimoy tidbit that may be of interest to some of you. (I did not see this mentioned in the obits.)

The part of Boston where Nimoy grew up was called the West End. It was an ethically diverse neighborhood filled with what would now be prime real estate right in the center of the city. The neighborhood was leveled circa 1960 in the name of "urban renewal." The densely-packed housing was replaced with a couple of high rise towers and some sprawling municipal monstrosities in the brutalist architectural style. The residents couldn't afford to move back into the high-rises, and even if they could, there weren't enough units to accommodate the number of residents. Decades later, the neighborhood's destruction remains a sore spot for many Bostonians, and to this day, it is universally acknowledged as a textbook example of how not to do urban renewal.

One day in the 1940s, someone in the West End snapped a picture of some boys who were outside playing in a field. The boy on the top right is Leonard Nimoy:

http://thewestendmuseum.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/leonard_nimoy.jpg

Like many West Enders, Nimoy kept the neighborhood with him. He named his boat the West End, and was a generous contributor to the West End historical society.

Here is a clip where he discusses the West End:

I loved the way Nimoy caressed the wallet when it was in his hands.

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Spock was the best thing about the original Star Trek, due in no small part to Nimoy's talents. I'd heard about his health problems, so this came as no real surprise, and yet still terrible news. RIP

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