Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Tom in RI

Streaming questions

21 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Some of my friends are using various streaming services and I suppose it’s inevitable that on my next move I’ll be getting rid of the majority of physical product I own and go streaming (not my preference, but…). Anyway, I’m curious what happens to music of labels that go belly up. For instance, do any streaming services have Chronogical Classics available? Maybe a better ask would be a label like Uptown. For major labels, are entire catalogs generally included? Trying to begin to plan on what I’ll keep and what I’ll part with.

Edited by Tom in RI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Funny, I just tested Spotify by trying the Bird at Town Hall 1945 but couldn't find it.  I guess you can't search by label.  (I  tested it years ago by seeing if they had the alternate take of the Prez Smith/Jones Lady be Good and much to my surprise they did.)

Edited by medjuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't get rid of anything that you wouldn't mind never being able to access again, just in case things get weird out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If we can expand on this topic and ask, which streaming service has the most robust jazz catalog, I would like to hear what others have to say. I’ve been using iTunes.  

My issue with iTunes, sometimes your search doesn’t return a complete result. For example I did a search on charles McPherson and not every session shows in the results. When I put in the exact title the missing ones appear. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I’ve been using Apple Music for a couple years now, and as hardbopjazz said the search return is iffy especially with jazz. For example you have Vinny golia, Vinny golia quartet, vinny golia trio etc and they are each different searches. Still for convenience and ease of use I use it. Plus a bunch of my family can piggyback, most recently my niece. 

Edited by jcam_44

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

13 hours ago, medjuck said:

Funny, I just tested Spotify by trying the Bird at Town Hall 1945 but couldn't find it.  I guess you can't search by label.  (I  tested it years ago by seeing if they had the alternate take of the Prez Smith/Jones Lady be Good and much to my surprise they did.)

It's there: https://open.spotify.com/album/6twcAIiSaa4QFnVLRBduEQ?highlight=spotify:track:5thv9QFTBhTFpoouqLIT8v& , but only three tracks are playable here in Austria (might be different depending on the territory - it is determined by the rights holder). There is a label search function, but it is no good. Google is a better option. 
 

12 hours ago, JSngry said:

Don't get rid of anything that you wouldn't mind never being able to access again, just in case things get weird out there.

Correct, stuff might and does disappear from streaming (I remember how disappointed I was when all the Glossa label (classical music) releases vanished - although they did reappear a year or so later). Having said that, the general tendency is for more stuff to be posted on streaming services all the time. You even have technological leapfrogging where albums that were LP-only appear on streaming without ever being reissued on CD (ECM / JAPO releases, MPS, etc.). Some albums are available in multiple remastered versions - e.g. there is a standard RVG of "The Rumproller": https://open.spotify.com/album/1KJRRyWB8xgLzWjsJJ9ytk and a (great-sounding) Japanese 2014 version: https://open.spotify.com/album/3dMhT1ZhEeYk9NwzPAzi3u .

Many Mosaics are on Spotify, btw. I started a thread with direct links, since they are not always easy to find: 

Amazon and Apple (as well as some smaller streaming platforms) offer HD or ultra-HD formats, I am sure Spotify will follow soon.

Apple has more jazz (e.g. CIMP / Cadence releases are only on Apple). I think they give better deal to the rights holders, hence more music. I personally hate their interface, though.  

An interesting streaming / download option for new releases in bandcamp. I see that many artists and small labels increasingly bypass large streaming platforms and go for bandcamp instead (interestingly, a typical new release option is "LP / bandcamp download now"). But bandcamp is less relevant for older stuff. 

Edited by Д.Д.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are streaming companies streaming in High definition audio or MP3? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm now reading the August 2021 issue of Stereophile, and there's an article on page 15 that's relevant here.  I'll try to summarize: "The theme (of the conference) was all the ways digital music deteriorates over time even as digital music technology improves, despite the theoretical robustness of digital...Streaming services contain an unknown number of outright damaged tracks, damaged in various ways.  How this damage occurs remains mysterious.  Lund's main example was Guy Clark's live rendition of "Baby Took a Limo to Memphis," from the album Together at the Bluebird Cafe on the American Originals label.  Lund heard a "farting sound" at several points in the Apple Music version of the track..."Farting happens at least at these times: 0:03, 0:09, 0:46, 0:55, 1:04, 1:49, 1:56, 2:03, 2:11, 2:25, 2:45, 2:48, 2:53, 3:15."  I heard farting sounds on the versions taken from Qobuz and Tidal, which suggests that it's not Apple Music's (or the other services') fault but, rather, the label's.  However, "Listening to the same track ripped from CD shows no signs of farting." (The article then lists other examples.)...All this is compounded by the fact that in the digital/streaming world, it's impossible to know exactly what you're listening to.  In the physical media era, all music had catalog numbers.  New CDs and LPs still have them, but digital music rarely does.  Without a unique identifier, how can you keep track of release-specific information?  And how can listeners know what they're listening to?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s a gas, gas, gas, indeed…

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mjzee said:

I'm now reading the August 2021 issue of Stereophile, and there's an article on page 15 that's relevant here.  I'll try to summarize: "The theme (of the conference) was all the ways digital music deteriorates over time even as digital music technology improves, despite the theoretical robustness of digital...Streaming services contain an unknown number of outright damaged tracks, damaged in various ways.  How this damage occurs remains mysterious.  Lund's main example was Guy Clark's live rendition of "Baby Took a Limo to Memphis," from the album Together at the Bluebird Cafe on the American Originals label.  Lund heard a "farting sound" at several points in the Apple Music version of the track..."Farting happens at least at these times: 0:03, 0:09, 0:46, 0:55, 1:04, 1:49, 1:56, 2:03, 2:11, 2:25, 2:45, 2:48, 2:53, 3:15."  I heard farting sounds on the versions taken from Qobuz and Tidal, which suggests that it's not Apple Music's (or the other services') fault but, rather, the label's.  However, "Listening to the same track ripped from CD shows no signs of farting." (The article then lists other examples.)...All this is compounded by the fact that in the digital/streaming world, it's impossible to know exactly what you're listening to.  In the physical media era, all music had catalog numbers.  New CDs and LPs still have them, but digital music rarely does.  Without a unique identifier, how can you keep track of release-specific information?  And how can listeners know what they're listening to?"

Digital music cannot deteriorate. A digital file can be damaged if not copied properly but that is not the result of deterioration. If a digital audio music file is copied and stored properly, it will sound the same every time you play it.

Stereophile is not really the place to get audio advice anyway. They have been peddling snake oil for decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will stick with my physical product. I still have plenty of space for now, though I may start thinning out some stuff within a few years if things get too crowded. I don't know that I want to have any more shelves built in this upstairs room, though an engineer assured me the beams would hold the estimated weight of the shelves I had built, the prefabs units that hold 9000+ more CDs, plus the furniture. I found Spotify rather annoying when I was trying to make recommendations for someone who used it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Staying with physical product is my first choice. However, my wife wants to move to the west coast (Southern California) to be close to our children. I won’t be able to afford the size space I enjoy now and I can also forget about a basement. Hard choices will have to be made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The nice thing about Apple Music is music you upload to iTunes that isn’t matched to Apple Music will upload to the cloud for you to stream. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/13/2021 at 9:51 AM, jcam_44 said:

The nice thing about Apple Music is music you upload to iTunes that isn’t matched to Apple Music will upload to the cloud for you to stream. 

I like that feature. 

Also, some OOO sessions are on the streaming service. For example, Charles Kynard's "Your Mama Don't Dance" is there in vinyl. You can hear the pops of the record.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hardbopjazz said:

I like that feature. 

Also, some OOO sessions are on the streaming service. For example, Charles Kynard's "Your Mama Don't Dance" is there in vinyl. You can hear the pops of the record.  

Forgive my ignorance: what's an OOO session?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, mjzee said:

Forgive my ignorance: what's an OOO session?

I meant OOP.

6 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Only One Outthere

:) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven’t tried streaming but on Hoffman I notice that a lot of people like Qobuz. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/8/2021 at 10:53 PM, mjzee said:

I'm now reading the August 2021 issue of Stereophile, and there's an article on page 15 that's relevant here.  I'll try to summarize: "The theme (of the conference) was all the ways digital music deteriorates over time even as digital music technology improves, despite the theoretical robustness of digital...Streaming services contain an unknown number of outright damaged tracks, damaged in various ways.  How this damage occurs remains mysterious.  Lund's main example was Guy Clark's live rendition of "Baby Took a Limo to Memphis," from the album Together at the Bluebird Cafe on the American Originals label.  Lund heard a "farting sound" at several points in the Apple Music version of the track..."Farting happens at least at these times: 0:03, 0:09, 0:46, 0:55, 1:04, 1:49, 1:56, 2:03, 2:11, 2:25, 2:45, 2:48, 2:53, 3:15."  I heard farting sounds on the versions taken from Qobuz and Tidal, which suggests that it's not Apple Music's (or the other services') fault but, rather, the label's.  

How do we know it's not the fault of whatever special the Bluebird Cafe was serving up that night? :g

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.